Assumptions Underlying Agile Software-Development Processes

Assumptions Underlying Agile Software-Development Processes

Daniel Turk (Colorado State University, USA), France. Robert (Colorado State University, USA) and Bernhard Rumpe (Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany)
Copyright: © 2005 |Pages: 26
DOI: 10.4018/jdm.2005100104
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Abstract

Agile processes focus on the early facilitation and fast production of working code, and are based on software-development process models that support iterative, incremental development of software. Although agile methods have existed for a number of years now, answers to questions concerning the suitability of agile processes to particular software-development environments are still often based on anecdotal accounts of experiences. An appreciation of the (often unstated) assumptions underlying agile processes can lead to a better understanding of the applicability of agile processes to particular situations. Agile processes are less likely to be applicable in situations in which core assumptions do not hold. This article examines the principles and advocated practices of agile processes to identify underlying assumptions. It also identifies limitations that may arise from these assumptions and outlines how the limitations can be addressed by incorporating other software-development techniques and practices into agile development environments.

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