Approaches for Community Decision Making and Collective Reasoning: Knowledge Technology Support

Approaches for Community Decision Making and Collective Reasoning: Knowledge Technology Support

John Yearwood (Federation University, Australia) and Andrew Stranieri (University of Ballarat, Australia)
Indexed In: SCOPUS
Release Date: June, 2012|Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 307
ISBN13: 9781466618183|ISBN10: 1466618183|EISBN13: 9781466618190|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-1818-3

Description

Technology currently encourages the capture and storage of vast quantities of data and information and so thinkers, reasoners, and decision-makers have available large resources to support their tasks. At the same time, there is a need to engage with an enormous range of complex issues that require reasoning and decisions that are actionable to address them.

Approaches for Community Decision Making and Collective Reasoning: Knowledge Technology Support acts to provide knowledge for each individual in a group with the broad structural wealth of reasoning. It also acts as an explicit structure that technological devices for supporting reasoning within a group can hook onto. If you are interested in how groups can structure their activities towards making better decisions or in developing technologies for the support of decision-making in groups, then this book is an excellent way to understand the state of the art and possible ways forward.

Topics Covered

The many academic areas covered in this publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Coalescing reasoning
  • Collective reasoning
  • Community decision making
  • Dialogue support
  • Group decision-making
  • Group reasoning structure
  • Knowledge Technology support
  • Reasoning community
  • Reasoning support

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

John Yearwood is Professor and Dean of School of Science, Information Technology, and Engineering, University of Ballarat, Australia. His research spans areas of pattern recognition, argumentation, reasoning, decision support, Web services, and their applications. He has been chief investigator on a number of ARC projects in these areas. His work has involved the development of new algorithms and approaches to classification based on modern non-smooth optimization techniques, new frameworks for structured reasoning, and their application in decision support and knowledge modelling. Some important outcomes relate to the use of text categorization techniques for detecting drugs responsible for adverse reactions. He is currently an ARC research fellow working in the area of argumentation and narrative structures. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology. He has over 210 refereed journal and conference publications.

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