Shopping Cart | Login | Register | Language: English

Advanced Palm OS Programming

Copyright © 2009. 21 pages.
OnDemand Chapter PDF Download
Download link provided immediately after order completion
$30.00
List Price: $37.50
Current Promotions:
20% Online Bookstore Discount*
Available. Instant access upon order completion.
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch014
Sample PDFCite

MLA

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Advanced Palm OS Programming." Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications. IGI Global, 2009. 351-371. Web. 22 Oct. 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch014

APA

Hu, W. (2009). Advanced Palm OS Programming. In W. Hu (Ed.), Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications (pp. 351-371). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch014

Chicago

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Advanced Palm OS Programming." In Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications, ed. Wen-Chen Hu, 351-371 (2009), accessed October 22, 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch014

Export Reference

Mendeley
Favorite
Advanced Palm OS Programming
Access on Platform
Browse by Subject
Top

Abstract

The introduction to Palm OS programming given in the previous chapter provided an overview of its structure and basic concepts. This chapter examines an advanced aspect of Palm OS programming, focusing on one major subject that is particularly relevant for handheld devices: forms. User interfaces such as check boxes and radio buttons can be contained in a form, allowing users to enter data that is, typically, then sent to a server for processing. It is important to note that this topic was selected to allow the reader to become familiar with how Palm OS operates; for other Palm OS topics such as databases and menus, readers may check the section later in this chapter on Palm OS References for further information. • In Palm OS, every file is a database, which is similar to the persistent storage of J2ME. A Palm database does not correspond to a “relational database” but is actually closer to a structured, flexible, and mobile binary data file. • A menu bar is displayed whenever the user taps a menu icon. The menu bar is also displayed when the user taps in a form’s titlebar. The menu bar, a horizontal list of menu titles, appears at the top of the screen in its own window, above all the application windows.
Chapter Preview

Introduction

The introduction to Palm OS programming given in the previous chapter provided an overview of its structure and basic concepts. This chapter examines an advanced aspect of Palm OS programming, focusing on one major subject that is particularly relevant for handheld devices: forms. User interfaces such as check boxes and radio buttons can be contained in a form, allowing users to enter data that is, typically, then sent to a server for processing. It is important to note that this topic was selected to allow the reader to become familiar with how Palm OS operates; for other Palm OS topics such as databases and menus, readers may check the section later in this chapter on Palm OS References for further information.

  • In Palm OS, every file is a database, which is similar to the persistent storage of J2ME. A Palm database does not correspond to a “relational database” but is actually closer to a structured, flexible, and mobile binary data file.

  • A menu bar is displayed whenever the user taps a menu icon. The menu bar is also displayed when the user taps in a form's titlebar. The menu bar, a horizontal list of menu titles, appears at the top of the screen in its own window, above all the application windows.

Forms

This section is divided into three sub-sections:

  • 1.

    Screenshots of execution results of the application Forms are given first to illustrate how the application is used before the programming details are discussed.

  • 2.

    User interface construction using Palm Resource Editor is then shown.

  • 3.

    Finally, the Palm C program is given and explained line by line.

Execution Results of the Application Forms

The following emulator screenshots show the interfaces generated by the application Forms, which displays various kinds of user interface that may be contained in forms:

  • Figure 1 shows the default Palm Applications interface with a new icon Forms. The icon was created by the project Forms, which will be discussed later. Note that the default icon is replaced by the image . The interface changes to the one shown in Figure 2 after the Forms icon is clicked.

    Figure 1.

    The default Palm Applications interface including a new icon Forms

  • Figure 2 shows the first interface of the application Forms, which includes various (disabled) buttons with/without (bold) frames. The interface changes to the interfaces shown in Figures 3 and 1 after the Next and Exit buttons are clicked, respectively.

    Figure 2.

    The first interface of the application Forms including various buttons

  • Figure 3 shows the second interface of the application Forms, which includes grouped push buttons and (grouped) checkboxes. The interface changes to the interfaces shown in Figures 2, 4, and 1 after the buttons Prev, Next, and Exit are clicked, respectively.

    Figure 3.

    The second interface of the application Forms including grouped push buttons and checkboxes

  • Figure 4 shows the third interface of the application Forms, which includes a list, repeat buttons and field, and a bitmap image. The interface changes to the interfaces shown in Figures 3 and 1 after the buttons Prev and Exit are clicked, respectively.

    Figure 4.

    The third interface of the application Forms including a list, repeat buttons and field, and a bitmap image

  • Figure 5 displays a help message for the application Forms reached by clicking on the letter ‘i’ in the top-right corner of each of the screens in Figures 2-4. The interface changes to the one shown in Figure 14.4 after the button Done is clicked.

    Figure 5.

    A help message for the application forms

Figure 14.

The push buttons in Form 1001

Top

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book: Reset
Chapter 1
Wen-Chen Hu
With the introduction of the World Wide Web, electronic commerce revolutionized traditional commerce, boosting sales and facilitating exchanges of... Sample PDF
Fundamentals of Mobile Commerce Systems
$37.50
Chapter 2
Wen-Chen Hu
Commerce, the exchange or buying and selling of commodities on a large scale involving transportation of goods from place to place, benefits from... Sample PDF
Mobile Commerce Applications
$37.50
Chapter 3
Wen-Chen Hu
Mobile users interact with mobile commerce applications by using small wireless Internet-enabled devices, which come with several aliases such as... Sample PDF
Mobile Handheld Devices
$37.50
Chapter 4
Wen-Chen Hu
Without ways to conduct secure commercial information exchange and safe electronic financial transactions over mobile networks, neither service... Sample PDF
Essential Mobile-Commerce Technology
$37.50
Chapter 5
Wen-Chen Hu
As handheld computing is a fairly new computing area, there is as yet no generally accepted formal definition. For the purposes of this book... Sample PDF
Mobile World Wide Web Content
$37.50
Chapter 6
Wen-Chen Hu
Wireless application protocol (WAP) (Open Mobile Alliance, 2003) is a suite of network protocols that specifies ways of sending data across the... Sample PDF
WML (Wireless Markup Language)
$37.50
Chapter 7
Advanced WML  (pages 180-206)
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter VI discusses the creation of static web pages, which have a fixed content at all times. In order to change static web pages to dynamic ones... Sample PDF
Advanced WML
$37.50
Chapter 8
WMLScript  (pages 207-228)
Wen-Chen Hu
WML is a markup language used for text formatting and displaying (Open Mobile Alliance, 2001). However, the functions of a markup language are... Sample PDF
WMLScript
$37.50
Chapter 9
Wen-Chen Hu
Numerous server-side handheld applications are available for devices. Some popular applications include: • Instant messages, which require service... Sample PDF
Database-Driven Mobile Web Content Construction
$37.50
Chapter 10
Wen-Chen Hu
There are two kinds of handheld computing and programming, namely client- and server- side handheld computing and programming. The most popular... Sample PDF
Client-Side Handheld Computing and Programming
$37.50
Chapter 11
Wen-Chen Hu
Most client-side handheld programming uses either Java or C/C++. This chapter introduces Java ME (previously known as J2ME), which is a version of... Sample PDF
Java ME (Java Platform, Micro Edition) Programming
$37.50
Chapter 12
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter XI introduced the basics of Java ME programming. This chapter will build on this, focusing on advanced Java ME programming. The following... Sample PDF
Advanced Java ME Programming
$37.50
Chapter 13
Palm OS Programming  (pages 333-350)
Wen-Chen Hu
Programming for Palm devices is not a trivial task and it is especially hard for beginners starting their first assignment. This chapter is not... Sample PDF
Palm OS Programming
$37.50
Chapter 14
Wen-Chen Hu
The introduction to Palm OS programming given in the previous chapter provided an overview of its structure and basic concepts. This chapter... Sample PDF
Advanced Palm OS Programming
$37.50