CBM Elements VII

CBM Elements VII

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 25
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch013
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Abstract

This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the science of culture. The following design factors are covered in this chapter: Cultural anomalies, Cultural cultures, and Cultural futures. This section, the science of culture, draws from key concepts in the fields of physical science, biological science, earth science, ecology, futures research, and crosscultural studies to explore the scientific nature of humanity and the possibilities of cultural futures. The science of culture seeks to assist human beings in adapting to their environment so that living can be achieved. This scientific way of thinking cuts across the natural, cultural, social, physical, and biological. Science is one of many ways of interpreting human reality (White, 1949).
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The Science Of Culture

  • Cultural anomalies

  • Cultural cultures

  • Cultural futures

  • Cultural infinities

  • Cultural nature

This section, the science of culture, draws from key concepts in the fields of physical science, biological science, earth science, ecology, futures research, and cross-cultural studies to explore the scientific nature of humanity and the possibilities of cultural futures. The science of culture seeks to assist human beings in adapting to their environment so that living can be achieved. This scientific way of thinking cuts across the natural, cultural, social, physical, and biological. Science is one of many ways of interpreting human reality (White, 1949).

Scientific models of culture focus on theorizing about the anthropology of science (Darwin, 1859). Similarly, the science of culture examines anthropological topics within the context of science. This move to study the anthropology of science is presented in the contemporary works of Strathern (1992) and Traweek (1988). Strathern (1992) examined the nature and social conditions of reproductive technologies as it relates to kinships. Traweek (1988) offered an ethnographic study of science and scientists by examining the life and culture of particle physicists. This developing research in the anthropology of science brings with it an examination of “cultural practice[s]” that are needed in the design of ICTs (Franklin, 1995, p. 179). This means that scientific inquiry is not limited to the sciences, as there are social aspects of science that also need further exploration (Plotkin, 2003).

The Elements are defined, described, illustrated and addressed in terms of society, culture and the target audience. Guiding questions that address the society and culture are broadly based, allowing for a surface review of the science of societies and cultures. Target audience GQ are specific to the group or individuals within the group.

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Cultural Anomalies

  • E21. Cultural Anomalies - Happenings that promote, initiate, or force cultural change.

Cultural anomalies refer to happenings that promote, initiate, or force cultural change. All societies change and are changed by cultural anomalies. Forces of nature and humanity have brought about cultural changes (Hofstede & Hofstede, 2005).

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