CBM Elements V

CBM Elements V

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch011
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Abstract

This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural knowledge, Cultural language, Cultural physiology, Cultural relations and Cultural resources are covered. Cultural knowledge examines what is known and what one comes to know (Thomas, 2001). It is the acquisition, learning, translation, transfer, teaching, recording, documentation, preservation, creation, accessibility, use, and application of knowledge “Most of what anyone knows is cultural knowledge (D’Andrade, 1995, p. xiv).” Over the course of a human’s life, they learn a wealth of knowledge. Humans store and pass on this knowledge from generation to generation. This cultural knowledge is contained in words, narratives, artifacts, and human experiences (Dougherty, 1985).
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Cultural Knowledge

  • E9. Cultural Knowledge - What is known and what one comes to know.

Cultural knowledge examines what is known and what one comes to know (Thomas, 2001). It is the acquisition, learning, translation, transfer, teaching, recording, documentation, preservation, creation, accessibility, use, and application of knowledge “Most of what anyone knows is cultural knowledge (D’Andrade, 1995, p. xiv).” Over the course of a human’s life, they learn a wealth of knowledge. Humans store and pass on this knowledge from generation to generation. This cultural knowledge is contained in words, narratives, artifacts, and human experiences (Dougherty, 1985).1

Knowledge can be thought of as that which is known or acquired. Known knowledge can be innately a part of an individual. For example, Confucius’s followers believed that certain exceptional individuals possessed “intrinsic knowledge” and that they were born with this knowledge (Thomas, 2001, p. 54). Acquired knowledge is learned through a variety of sources; however, it varies from culture to culture. Some common examples of acquired knowledge are lived experience, modeling others, and instruction (e.g., schooling, apprenticeship). In some cultures, dreams are believed to be a source of knowledge because dreams can reveal the future and guide life choices. Visions are considered a way of acquiring knowledge. For example, many Great Plains Indian tribes practice the ritual of vision quest. In this ritual, information is sought to determine an individual’s sacred name, guiding spirit, and other knowledge (Thomas, 2001).

Culture GQ

What is the history of knowledge in this society or culture? How does a human being acquire knowledge? How is knowledge learned by human beings? How is knowledge translated to the human being? How is knowledge transferred from one human being to another human being? How is knowledge taught to the human being? Through what means is knowledge recorded? Through what means is knowledge documented? Through what means is knowledge preserved? Through what means is knowledge created? How is knowledge made accessible? How is knowledge preserved by the human being? How is knowledge learned by human beings? Who within the society or culture creates this knowledge? How is this knowledge validated? Who has access to this knowledge? How is this knowledge used and applied? What is the logic or reasoning behind this knowledge? When does knowledge become information? How do individuals know what they know? What forms of technology have been used to acquire, learn, translate, transfer, teach, record, document, preserve, create, access, use, and apply knowledge? How is knowledge used as power in this society or culture?

Target Audience GQ

What is the history of knowledge as it pertains to the target audience? How is knowledge acquired by the target audience? How is knowledge learned by the target audience? How is knowledge translated to the target audience? How is knowledge transferred from one target audience member to another? How is knowledge taught to the target audience? Through what means is knowledge recorded by the target audience? Through what means is knowledge documented by the target audience? Through what means is knowledge preserved for the target audience? Through what means is knowledge created by the target audience? How is knowledge made accessible to the target audience? How is knowledge preserved by the target audience? How is knowledge learned by the target audience? Who within the target audience creates this knowledge? How is this knowledge validated by the target audience? Who has access to the knowledge generated by the target audience? How is knowledge used and applied by the target audience? What is the logic or reasoning behind this knowledge? How does the target audience know what they know? For the target audience, what forms of technology have been used to acquire, learn, translate, transfer, teach, record, document, preserve, create, access, use and apply knowledge? How has the target audience participated as producers of theories, recipients of theories, or participants in the formulation of knowledge? Is knowledge used to empower or control the target audience, and if so, in what way? How does the target audience feel about their ability to access, create, or acquire knowledge?

Complete Chapter List

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Dedication
Table of Contents
Foreword
Rita C. Richey
Acknowledgment
Chapter 1
Patricia A. Young
If the history of the world is properly searched, the birth of innovation in learning theory as a practice and psychology as a science can be found... Sample PDF
Beginnings in Instructional Design and Culture
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Chapter 2
Patricia A. Young
There have been many definitions of culture hypothesized by theorists and scholars as a way to understand human beings, other species and entities;... Sample PDF
The Nature of Culture in Design
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Chapter 3
Patricia A. Young
The incorporation of culture in the design process is not a simple task. It is one with multiple layers of depth and complexity. But it is also not... Sample PDF
The Culture-Based Model Framework
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Chapter 4
Patricia A. Young
Inquiry (11-16) monitors development, automates the internal flow of the design process, and functions as internal sensors. This monitoring checks... Sample PDF
CBM Inquiry, Development
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Chapter 5
Patricia A. Young
Team (T1–T3) focuses on the recruitment of a culturally sensitive design team that includes a cultural expert, an educator, and other culturally... Sample PDF
CBM Team, Assessments, Brainstorming
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Chapter 6
CBM Learners  (pages 88-99)
Patricia A. Young
The Learners (L1-L10) area centers on the needs of learners and learning. These design factors assist in providing a dynamic learning environment... Sample PDF
CBM Learners
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Chapter 7
CBM Elements I  (pages 100-125)
Patricia A. Young
Elements (E1-E25) facilitate content development. These Elements are intended to be comprehensive in providing the fundamental total of which all... Sample PDF
CBM Elements I
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Chapter 8
CBM Elements II  (pages 126-141)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural communications is covered in its... Sample PDF
CBM Elements II
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Chapter 9
CBM Elements III  (pages 142-173)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural demographics and Cultural... Sample PDF
CBM Elements III
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Chapter 10
CBM Elements IV  (pages 174-214)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural history is covered in its entirety.... Sample PDF
CBM Elements IV
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Chapter 11
CBM Elements V  (pages 215-231)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural knowledge, Cultural language... Sample PDF
CBM Elements V
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Chapter 12
CBM Elements VI  (pages 232-253)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the psychology of culture. All of the design factors related to... Sample PDF
CBM Elements VI
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Chapter 13
CBM Elements VII  (pages 254-278)
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the science of culture. The following design factors are covered in this... Sample PDF
CBM Elements VII
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Chapter 14
Patricia A. Young
This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the science of culture. The following design factors are covered in this... Sample PDF
CBM Elements VII & Training
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Chapter 15
Patricia A. Young
Instructional design includes the production of educational products such as software, Web-based environments, video games, videos, films, and print... Sample PDF
Case Study of an Educational Product
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Chapter 16
Case Study in Game Design  (pages 316-330)
Patricia A. Young
The global game industry expects substantial growth in the next decades. Massive multiplayer online games (MMOG) are expected to skyrocket from the... Sample PDF
Case Study in Game Design
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Chapter 17
Case Study in E-Learning  (pages 331-341)
Patricia A. Young
The future of e-learning is wide open in terms of innovations in software, hardware, instructional content, and teaching practices. Recent... Sample PDF
Case Study in E-Learning
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Chapter 18
Case Study in Research  (pages 342-358)
Patricia A. Young
Research is seen as a bad word, more work and lots more money. However, research is a good thing to do and engage in before, during and after... Sample PDF
Case Study in Research
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Chapter 19
Conclusion  (pages 359-364)
Patricia A. Young
Culture works as a design construct. It is apparent that there are many factors operating to make this happen. First, the nature of culture in... Sample PDF
Conclusion
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About the Author