CBM Learners

CBM Learners

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 12
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch006
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Abstract

The Learners (L1-L10) area centers on the needs of learners and learning. These design factors assist in providing a dynamic learning environment that is supportive of the learner’s cultural frames of reference and seeks to meet the learning outcomes of the project. The design factors are adaptive to learners on multiple levels including intellectual, motivational, and educational, thereby providing opportunities for individualized instruction. Other design factors in this area focus on meeting the needs of the target audience through a variety of strategies including providing opportunities to extend learning beyond design requirements; differentiating learning opportunities; empowering and engaging learners; instilling proactive learning; identifying educational objectives; enculturating the learner; and incorporating culture-based instructional strategies.
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Cbm Learners

The Learners (L1-L10) area centers on the needs of learners and learning. These design factors assist in providing a dynamic learning environment that is supportive of the learner’s cultural frames of reference and seeks to meet the learning outcomes of the project. The design factors are adaptive to learners on multiple levels including intellectual, motivational, and educational, thereby providing opportunities for individualized instruction. Other design factors in this area focus on meeting the needs of the target audience through a variety of strategies including providing opportunities to extend learning beyond design requirements; differentiating learning opportunities; empowering and engaging learners; instilling proactive learning; identifying educational objectives; enculturating the learner; and incorporating culture-based instructional strategies.

To design instructional products for human beings means knowing how learners learn. This design process is more inquiry based. Determine what methods of learning are most appropriate for a learner. This suggests asking the learner, observing the learner, analyzing situations where the learner learns, or reviewing relevant research (Gagne & Briggs, 1974). Designing instruction without knowledge of the learner means making assumptions about the learner. This imposes upon the learner ones own values and dispositions versus allowing the learner to reveal their learning styles or ways of understanding and knowing. In terms of applying a theory of learning, this step should not be done without first knowing the learner. Once the learner is understood; then a theory of learning can be applied or applications designed based on the needs of the learner. The selection and design of instruction should be based on what is known about learners not that assumed to be known.

  • L1. Extend learning. Provide opportunities for extended learning.

  • L2. Differentiate opportunities to learn. Provide a variety of learning options.

  • L3. Empower and engage learners. Provide opportunities for empowering learners and engaging instruction.

  • L4. Teach proactive learning. Help learners to be proactive in improving their own learning.

  • L5. Identify educational objectives. Have an underlying educational and/or learning objective.

  • L6. Culture-specific instructional strategies. Consider instructional strategies that are individual or group specific.

  • L7. Enrich instructional content. Expand instructional content beyond subject matter.

  • L8. Adapt instruction to learner. Provide adaptable instruction that is not too grade level or age level specific.

  • L9. Plan for instruction. Focus on the short and long term instructional needs of the target audience.

  • L10. Enculturate the learner. Use the product to enculturate the learner into the culture.

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