Disaggregating the Journey to Homicide

Disaggregating the Journey to Homicide

Elizabeth Groff (Institute for Law and Justice, USA) and J. Thomas McEwen (Institute for Law and Justice, USA)
Copyright: © 2005 |Pages: 24
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-453-8.ch004
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Abstract

This research examines the distance traveled by offenders and victims to their involvement in homicide. Key research topics include (1) the differences in distance traveled by offenders and victims by homicide motive, (2) the differences in distance traveled by offenders and victims by sex and age, and (3) the relationship between street distance and Euclidean distances by type of homicide. Findings indicate that there are clear differences in travel behavior between victims and offenders. In addition, travel distance to event location varies according to the demographic characteristics of the offender and victim. Related to the method of measurement, street distance is always longer than Euclidean distance and there is a strong and consistent linear relationship, making it possible to predict street distance from Euclidean distance. A Pareto-exponential function was determined to be a good model for representing the distances that offenders travel to their crimes. This research will assist police practitioners with respect to investigations (for example, aid in refining suspect lists) and homicide prevention (for example, by developing richer information about activity spaces of offenders and victims).

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