Fault-Tolerant Protocols Using Fault-Tolerance Programming Languages

Fault-Tolerant Protocols Using Fault-Tolerance Programming Languages

Vincenzo De Florio (PATS Research Group, University of Antwerp and iMinds, Belgium)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-182-7.ch005
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Abstract

The programming language itself is the focus of this chapter: Fault-tolerance is not embedded in the program (as it is the case e.g. for single-version fault-tolerance), nor around the language (through compilers or translators); on the contrary, faulttolerance is provided through the syntactical structures and the run-time executives of fault-tolerance programming languages. Also in this case a significant part of the complexity of dependability enforcement is moved from each single code to the architecture, in this case the programming language. Many cases exist of fault-tolerance programming languages; this chapter proposes a few of them, considering three cases: Object-oriented languages, functional languages, and hybrid languages. In particular it is discussed the case of Oz, a multi-paradigm programming language that achieves both transparent distribution and translucent failure handling.
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Introduction And Objectives

The programming language itself is the focus of this chapter: Fault-tolerance is not embedded in the program (as it is the case e.g. for single-version fault-tolerance), nor around the language (through compilers or translators); on the contrary, fault-tolerance is provided through the syntactical structures and the run-time executives of fault-tolerance programming languages. Also in this case a significant part of the complexity of dependability enforcement is moved from each single code to the architecture, in this case the programming language.

Many cases exist of fault-tolerance programming languages; this chapter proposes a few of them, considering three cases: Object-oriented languages, functional languages, and hybrid languages. In particular it is discussed the case of Oz, a multi-paradigm programming language that achieves both transparent distribution and translucent failure handling.

Another approach is given by working at language level enhancing a pre-existing programming language or developing an ad hoc distributed programming language so that it hosts specific fault-tolerance provisions. The following two sections cover these topics.

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