The Impact of Computer Self-Efficacy and System Complexity on Acceptance of Information Technologies

The Impact of Computer Self-Efficacy and System Complexity on Acceptance of Information Technologies

Bassam Hasan (The University of Toledo, USA) and Jafar M. Ali (Kuwait University, Kuwait)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-128-5.ch015
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Abstract

The acceptance and use of information technologies by target users remain a key issue in information systems (IS) research and practice. Building on past research and integrating computer self-efficacy (CSE) and perceived system complexity (SC) as external variables to the technology acceptance model (TAM), this study examines the direct and indirect effects of these two factors on system eventual acceptance and use. Overall, both CSE and SC demonstrated significant direct effects on perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use as well as indirect effects on attitude and behavioral intention. With respect to TAM’s variables, perceived ease of use demonstrated a stronger effect on attitude than that of perceived usefulness. Finally, attitude demonstrated a non-significant impact on behavioral intention. Several implications for research and practice can be drawn from the results of this study.
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Research Model

The research model underlying the present study (Figure 1) was based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) and relevant research. The research model incorporates computer self-efficacy (CSE) and perceived system complexity, in a single study, as direct determinants of user beliefs about usefulness and ease of use. Moreover, consistent with TAM, the research model suggests indirect relationships among the two external factors, attitude, and behavioral intention.

Figure 1.

TAM and research model

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