Information Commons and Web 2.0 Technologies: Creating Rhetorical Situations and Enacting Habermasian Ideals in the Academic Library

Information Commons and Web 2.0 Technologies: Creating Rhetorical Situations and Enacting Habermasian Ideals in the Academic Library

Elisabeth Pankl (Kansas State University, USA) and Jenna Ryan (Louisiana State University, USA)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-863-5.ch060
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Abstract

This chapter delves into the transformation of academic libraries in response to two main elements: Information Commons and Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis. This transformation carries immense pedagogical significance for academic libraries by asserting a stronger presence of information literacy within the university curriculum. Traditional concepts of space, both virtual and physical, are also challenged by the inclusion of Information Commons and Web 2.0 technologies within academic libraries. Ultimately, what is revolutionized by these additions is the understanding of communication and pedagogy on the university campus.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Information Commons: An Information Commons is a space found in a library (most often an academic library) that is designed around the social construction of knowledge. This space is often equipped with up-to-date technology.

Rhetoric and Rhetoric Literacy: Rhetoric is language-in-action. Rhetorical literacy, then, is the facility one possesses with using and understanding language on a sophisticated level.

Web 2.0: Web 2.0 refers to the participatory Web-based technologies, such as blogs and wikis.

Wiki: A wiki is a Web-based content management system with an easy-to-understand interface that allows users to collaboratively manage and share information.

Public Sphere: The Habermasian Public Sphere is the ideal of the neutral space, away from economics and politics, where pluralistic argumentation can exist in the creation of the democratic ideal.

Blog: A blog is an online journal with dated posts using WYSIWYG software that allows nearly anyone to have a published presence on the Web. A blog typically functions as a diary of sorts and is used for everything from maintaining contact with family and friends to serious academic work.

Blog: A blog is an online journal with dated posts using WYSIWYG software that allows nearly anyone to have a published presence on the Web. A blog typically functions as a diary of sorts and is used for everything from maintaining contact with family and friends to serious academic work.

Rhetoric and Rhetoric Literacy: Rhetoric is language-in-action. Rhetorical literacy, then, is the facility one possesses with using and understanding language on a sophisticated level.

Computer Mediated Communication (CMC): CMC refers to the evolution of the host of mediums for electronic communication.

Web 2.0: Web 2.0 refers to the participatory Web-based technologies, such as blogs and wikis.

Wiki: A wiki is a Web-based content management system with an easy-to-understand interface that allows users to collaboratively manage and share information.

Information Commons: An Information Commons is a space found in a library (most often an academic library) that is designed around the social construction of knowledge. This space is often equipped with up-to-date technology.

Public Sphere: The Habermasian Public Sphere is the ideal of the neutral space, away from economics and politics, where pluralistic argumentation can exist in the creation of the democratic ideal.

Computer Mediated Communication (CMC): CMC refers to the evolution of the host of mediums for electronic communication.

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