A Method for Systematic Artifact Selection Decision Making

A Method for Systematic Artifact Selection Decision Making

Joanna Lumsden (National Research Council of Canada, Canada)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-843-7.ch069
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Abstract

Artifact selection decisions typically involve the selection of one from a number of possible/candidate options (decision alternatives). In order to support such decisions, it is important to identify and recognize relevant key issues of problem solving and decision making (Albers, 1996; Harris, 1998a, 1998b; Jacobs & Holten, 1995; Loch & Conger, 1996; Rumble, 1991; Sauter, 1999; Simon, 1986). Sauter classifies four problem solving/decision making styles: (1) left-brain style, (2) right-brain style, (3) accommodating, and (4) integrated (Sauter, 1999). The left-brain style employs analytical and quantitative techniques and relies on rational and logical reasoning. In an effort to achieve predictability and minimize uncertainty, problems are explicitly defined, solution methods are determined, orderly information searches are conducted, and analysis is increasingly refined. Left-brain style decision making works best when it is possible to predict/control, measure, and quantify all relevant variables, and when information is complete. In direct contrast, right-brain style decision making is based on intuitive techniques—it places more emphasis on feelings than facts. Accommodating decision makers use their non-dominant style when they realize that it will work best in a given situation. Lastly, integrated style decision makers are able to combine the left- and right-brain styles—they use analytical processes to filter information and intuition to contend with uncertainty and complexity.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Satisficing Decision Making: A decision making process which centers around goal adjustment and trade-offs whereby lower-level goals are substituted for maximized goals such that the first satisfactory, rather than the best, option is selected.

Optimization Models: Models that generate the notion of an optimal solution based on a set of constraints.

Good Decision: A decision that is logical, based on available information, and reflects context-sensitive values set for the problem solution.

Visual Interactive Modeling DSS: DSS tools which support the generation and modification of different visual representations of decision alternatives.

Right-Brain Style Decision Making: A style of decision making which is based on intuitive techniques, placing more emphasis on feelings than facts.

Suggestion Models: Models which return a suggested decision relative to a structured task.

Artifact: An object shaped or produced by man.

Model-Driven DSS: Functionally based on one or more quantitative models, these DSS tools are designed such that a user can manipulate model parameters in order to analyze decision alternatives.

Optimizing Decision Making: A decision making process of identifying as many different options as possible and choosing the best.

Accommodating Style Decision Making: A style of decision making in which decision makers use their non-dominant style when they realize that it will work best in a given situation.

Left-Brain Style Decision Making: A style of decision making which employs analytical and quantitative techniques and relies on rational and logical reasoning.

Bad Decision: A decision that is based on inadequate information and does not reflect intended values.

Integrated Style Decision Making: A style of decision making in which decision makers are able to combine the left- and right-brain styles—they use analytical processes to filter information and intuition to contend with uncertainty and complexity.

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