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Mobile Commerce Applications

Copyright © 2009. 20 pages.
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DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch002
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MLA

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Mobile Commerce Applications." Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications. IGI Global, 2009. 26-45. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch002

APA

Hu, W. (2009). Mobile Commerce Applications. In W. Hu (Ed.), Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications (pp. 26-45). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch002

Chicago

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Mobile Commerce Applications." In Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications, ed. Wen-Chen Hu, 26-45 (2009), accessed April 21, 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch002

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Abstract

Commerce, the exchange or buying and selling of commodities on a large scale involving transportation of goods from place to place, benefits from the convenience and ubiquity conveyed by mobile commerce technology. There are many instances that illustrate how mobile handheld devices help commerce. Important considerations that must be taken into account when trying to categorize applications include the nature of the communicating parties (e.g. people, intelligent agents, databases, sensors), the types of handheld mobile devices involved (e.g., cell phones, smart phones, PDAs, tablets), the nature of the transaction (e.g., push or pull delivery systems), and the actual content of the communication (e.g., a bank transaction, weather alert, or digital image). Not all m-commerce consists of buying and selling; other types of transactions such as banking transactions (e.g. bill paying) or polling (on-line surveys) are also of interest. In fact, “mobile transactions” or “mobile services” are probably more general terms for the concepts that we will discuss here. Obviously, no transaction can take place without some means of communication, whether it be face-to-face speech, so-called “snail” mail, e-mail, telephone, inter-office memos, or other means. Thus, one way in which mobile commerce applications can be differentiated is by their means of communication. For handheld mobile devices this will always involve some form of wireless technology, but the connection could transmit either voices or data. Another way in which mobile commerce applications can be differentiated is by the nature of the entities originating the communications on either end of the transaction; participants in m-commerce might be humans, or they might be intelligent agents representing humans or business entities, and in either case may be either at a fixed location or mobile. A third way to differentiate mobile handheld applications is by the computing demands they place on the handheld device. Applications which can run on ordinary cell phones are suitable for a mass market, while those that require more powerful clients like laptops are more likely to be aimed at smaller groups of users. Mobile applications that are location-aware will require a client device to have GPS capabilities, so that the user’s physical location can be ascertained. Table 2.1 uses these taxonomy features to identify the fundamental nature of applications in each category. The physical devices that support all of these various applications are evolving rapidly. At present there are a number of differently named devices competing in this application arena, including cell phones, “smart” phones, PDAs, tablet PCs and laptop computers. Future research is likely to focus on designing and producing a single device that will support all of these applications for most users. Although calling such a multi-purpose object a “phone” seems grossly inadequate, it will surely include that communication capability because cell phones are the most popular mobile devices today and are generally regarded as indispensable by their owners. The name that will evolve for this gadget is yet to be imagined.
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Introduction

Commerce, the exchange or buying and selling of commodities on a large scale involving transportation of goods from place to place, benefits from the convenience and ubiquity conveyed by mobile commerce technology. There are many instances that illustrate how mobile handheld devices help commerce. Important considerations that must be taken into account when trying to categorize applications include the nature of the communicating parties (e.g. people, intelligent agents, databases, sensors), the types of handheld mobile devices involved (e.g., cell phones, smart phones, PDAs, tablets), the nature of the transaction (e.g., push or pull delivery systems), and the actual content of the communication (e.g., a bank transaction, weather alert, or digital image). Not all m-commerce consists of buying and selling; other types of transactions such as banking transactions (e.g. bill paying) or polling (on-line surveys) are also of interest. In fact, “mobile transactions” or “mobile services” are probably more general terms for the concepts that we will discuss here. Obviously, no transaction can take place without some means of communication, whether it be face-to-face speech, so-called “snail” mail, e-mail, telephone, inter-office memos, or other means. Thus, one way in which mobile commerce applications can be differentiated is by their means of communication. For handheld mobile devices this will always involve some form of wireless technology, but the connection could transmit either voices or data.

Another way in which mobile commerce applications can be differentiated is by the nature of the entities originating the communications on either end of the transaction; participants in m-commerce might be humans, or they might be intelligent agents representing humans or business entities, and in either case may be either at a fixed location or mobile. A third way to differentiate mobile handheld applications is by the computing demands they place on the handheld device. Applications which can run on ordinary cell phones are suitable for a mass market, while those that require more powerful clients like laptops are more likely to be aimed at smaller groups of users. Mobile applications that are location-aware will require a client device to have GPS capabilities, so that the user’s physical location can be ascertained. Table 1 uses these taxonomy features to identify the fundamental nature of applications in each category.

Table 1.
Taxonomy of transaction characteristics and compatible mobile applications
CharacteristicsTypes of Mobile Handheld Applications
Voice, human-human, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerTalking
Voice, human-agent, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerLeaving messages and automated response systems
Voice, agent-agent, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerNone (agents don’t talk, though they can generate speech in order to communicate with humans)
Data, human-human, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerChat rooms
Data, human-agent, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerLogging, journaling, editing, e-mail, web browsing, downloading, and on-line games
Data, agent-agent, & cell/smartphone/PDA/computerAutomated fund transfers and automatic toll payment
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Complete Chapter List

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Chapter 1
Wen-Chen Hu
With the introduction of the World Wide Web, electronic commerce revolutionized traditional commerce, boosting sales and facilitating exchanges of... Sample PDF
Fundamentals of Mobile Commerce Systems
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Chapter 2
Wen-Chen Hu
Commerce, the exchange or buying and selling of commodities on a large scale involving transportation of goods from place to place, benefits from... Sample PDF
Mobile Commerce Applications
$37.50
Chapter 3
Wen-Chen Hu
Mobile users interact with mobile commerce applications by using small wireless Internet-enabled devices, which come with several aliases such as... Sample PDF
Mobile Handheld Devices
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Chapter 4
Wen-Chen Hu
Without ways to conduct secure commercial information exchange and safe electronic financial transactions over mobile networks, neither service... Sample PDF
Essential Mobile-Commerce Technology
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Chapter 5
Wen-Chen Hu
As handheld computing is a fairly new computing area, there is as yet no generally accepted formal definition. For the purposes of this book... Sample PDF
Mobile World Wide Web Content
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Chapter 6
Wen-Chen Hu
Wireless application protocol (WAP) (Open Mobile Alliance, 2003) is a suite of network protocols that specifies ways of sending data across the... Sample PDF
WML (Wireless Markup Language)
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Chapter 7
Advanced WML  (pages 180-206)
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter VI discusses the creation of static web pages, which have a fixed content at all times. In order to change static web pages to dynamic ones... Sample PDF
Advanced WML
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Chapter 8
WMLScript  (pages 207-228)
Wen-Chen Hu
WML is a markup language used for text formatting and displaying (Open Mobile Alliance, 2001). However, the functions of a markup language are... Sample PDF
WMLScript
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Chapter 9
Wen-Chen Hu
Numerous server-side handheld applications are available for devices. Some popular applications include: • Instant messages, which require service... Sample PDF
Database-Driven Mobile Web Content Construction
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Chapter 10
Wen-Chen Hu
There are two kinds of handheld computing and programming, namely client- and server- side handheld computing and programming. The most popular... Sample PDF
Client-Side Handheld Computing and Programming
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Chapter 11
Wen-Chen Hu
Most client-side handheld programming uses either Java or C/C++. This chapter introduces Java ME (previously known as J2ME), which is a version of... Sample PDF
Java ME (Java Platform, Micro Edition) Programming
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Chapter 12
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter XI introduced the basics of Java ME programming. This chapter will build on this, focusing on advanced Java ME programming. The following... Sample PDF
Advanced Java ME Programming
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Chapter 13
Palm OS Programming  (pages 333-350)
Wen-Chen Hu
Programming for Palm devices is not a trivial task and it is especially hard for beginners starting their first assignment. This chapter is not... Sample PDF
Palm OS Programming
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Chapter 14
Wen-Chen Hu
The introduction to Palm OS programming given in the previous chapter provided an overview of its structure and basic concepts. This chapter... Sample PDF
Advanced Palm OS Programming
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