Partnership Global IT Business

Partnership Global IT Business

Mary Kirk (Metropolitan State University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-786-7.ch010
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Abstract

In Chapter VII, I asked how our knowledge about the dramatically unequal distribution of global income combined with the estimates on global population growth might raise questions about our social responsibility to each other as a human community with regard to the direction of development efforts in the IT industry. How might we use technology to close the existing (and rapidly growing) gap between the haves and have-nots worldwide? How might we use IT in service of human need instead of placing humans in service of the technology? What are the most critical global social concerns that technology might serve? Can we afford the either/or attitude of IT businesses that completely divorce profit-making IT development from broader social concerns? What might a partnership philosophy of science look like? What might a partnership global IT business look like? This chapter outlines a few starting points for answering these questions by exploring the following topics in relation to co-creating a partnership global IT business: (1) U.S. economic dominance in IT; (2) “partnerism” a new economic model; (3) global IT development ideas between developed and developing nations; (4) partnership IT policy making; (5) examples of partnership science and IT; and (6) ideas for where you can begin to co-create partnership. In Chapter I, I contrasted the characteristics of dominator and partnership social systems. Table 1 describes the characteristics of partnership social systems that are particularly relevant to the global IT business as a social institution as they relate to the topics covered in this chapter (Eisler, 1987, 2002, 2007; Eisler & Loye, 1990; Eisler & Miller, 2004).
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Objectives

This chapter aims to help you understand the following:

  • The core characteristics of a partnership social system that most closely relate to the global IT business as a social institution.

  • How global IT businesses in the U.S. need to shift from dominator to partnership perspectives.

  • Why we need a new global economic model, such as Riane Eisler’s (2007) “partnerism.”

  • How developed nations can work in partnership with developing nations regarding the global IT business in a way that does not reify our historical dominator colonial relations.

  • How to begin to envision partnership policy making in the global IT business.

  • How one individual can contribute to co-creating partnership in the global IT business as a social institution.

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Introduction

In Chapter VII, I asked how our knowledge about the dramatically unequal distribution of global income combined with the estimates on global population growth might raise questions about our social responsibility to each other as a human community with regard to the direction of development efforts in the IT industry. How might we use technology to close the existing (and rapidly growing) gap between the haves and have-nots worldwide? How might we use IT in service of human need instead of placing humans in service of the technology? What are the most critical global social concerns that technology might serve? Can we afford the either/or attitude of IT businesses that completely divorce profit-making IT development from broader social concerns? What might a partnership philosophy of science look like? What might a partnership global IT business look like? This chapter outlines a few starting points for answering these questions by exploring the following topics in relation to co-creating a partnership global IT business: (1) U.S. economic dominance in IT; (2) “partnerism” a new economic model; (3) global IT development ideas between developed and developing nations; (4) partnership IT policy making; (5) examples of partnership science and IT; and (6) ideas for where you can begin to co-create partnership.

In Chapter I, I contrasted the characteristics of dominator and partnership social systems. Table 1 describes the characteristics of partnership social systems that are particularly relevant to the global IT business as a social institution as they relate to the topics covered in this chapter (Eisler, 1987, 2002, 2007; Eisler & Loye, 1990; Eisler & Miller, 2004).

Table 1.
Characteristics of partnership social systems linked to topics in this chapter
Partnership CharacteristicRelated Topic in Chapter X
Trust- and respect-basedPartnerism: A caring economics
Hierarchies of actualizationAre you going to eat that?
Partnerism: A caring economics
Emphasis on linkingPartnerism: A caring economics
Win/win orientationPartnerism: A caring economics
Low degree of fear, abuse, violence, since they are not required to maintain rigid rankingsPartnerism: A caring economics
Value traits that promote human development such as nonviolence, empathy, and caregivingPartnerism: A caring economics
Images of nurturance honored, institutionalizedPartnerism: A caring economics
Leaders imaged as anyone who inspires others to collaborate on commonly agreed upon goalsPartnerism: A caring economics
Sharing nicely with the other children
Planning includes short- and long-term concerns for present and future generationsAre you going to eat that?
Partnerism: A caring economics
Sharing nicely with the other children
Partnership in IT policy making
Emphasis on sustainability, sharingAre you going to eat that?
Partnerism: A caring economics
Sharing nicely with the other children
Partnership in IT policy making
Society viewed as a living organism with people as involved cocreatorsAre you going to eat that?
Partnerism: A caring economics
Partnership in IT policy making
Earth imaged as a living organism of which we are all a partPartnerism: A caring economics

Complete Chapter List

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Table of Contents
Foreword
Riane Eisler
Preface
Mary Kirk
Acknowledgment
Mary Kirk
Chapter 1
Mary Kirk
One barrier to more people understanding the work of feminist scholars is a fallacious view of “feminism” that has transformed an entire area of... Sample PDF
Demyth-ifying Feminism: Reclaiming the “F” Word
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Chapter 2
Mary Kirk
Dualisms are a hallmark of dominator societies, and dualistic thinking is a deeplyembedded attitude that shapes our values and beliefs. The... Sample PDF
Dualisms and Stereotypes: Tools of Domination
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Chapter 3
Mary Kirk
This chapter explores the ways in which the dualistic notion of gender is at the core of many fundamental ideas in the philosophy of science. The... Sample PDF
Gendered Philosophy of Science: Science is Male, Nature is Female
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Chapter 4
Mary Kirk
Communication is generally understood as a two-part process consisting of messages that convey content and the interpretation of that content by the... Sample PDF
Mass Media as Social Institution: The Wired Example
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Chapter 5
Mary Kirk
Language as a social institution is the primary symbol system through which we teach/learn about our dominator culture. The assumptions, values... Sample PDF
Language as Social Institution: The Male-Centered IT Culture
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Chapter 6
Mary Kirk
Education is another of the primary social institutions from which we learn the values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of a dominator culture. A... Sample PDF
Education as Social Institution: Understanding Her-Story
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Chapter 7
Mary Kirk
The global IT business as a social institution reflects the same dominator values as other social institutions in the U.S. Since IT is a large and... Sample PDF
Business as Social Institution: Global Issues in IT
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Chapter 8
Mary Kirk
In Chapter IV, I discussed how language operates as a social institution to teach us the values, attitudes, and beliefs of our society. Our... Sample PDF
Partnership Language and Media: Creating a New IT Culture
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Chapter 9
Mary Kirk
Ultimately, creating lasting and long-term change in the participation of women as developers, users, and beneficiaries of technology necessitates... Sample PDF
Partnership Science and Technology Education
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Chapter 10
Mary Kirk
In Chapter VII, I asked how our knowledge about the dramatically unequal distribution of global income combined with the estimates on global... Sample PDF
Partnership Global IT Business
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Chapter 11
Mary Kirk
This book has offered one feminist’s perspective on how a deeper understanding of our dominator social system might clarify why women are... Sample PDF
A Concluding Pledge: With Technology and Justice for All
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