Partnership Science and Technology Education

Partnership Science and Technology Education

Mary Kirk (Metropolitan State University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-786-7.ch009
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Abstract

Ultimately, creating lasting and long-term change in the participation of women as developers, users, and beneficiaries of technology necessitates addressing this change in all of our social institutions. However, as the social institution that is given explicit responsibility for teaching the next generation of citizens, education holds particularly significant potential to be a positive force for change. We need a fundamental shift in the culture of science and IT away from its dominator roots to a partnership perspective, and we all (i.e., teachers, students, parents, businessowners, and citizens) need to co-create this change together. In Tomorrow’s Children: A Blueprint for Partnership Education in the 21st Century, Riane Eisler (2000) calls for changes in content (what we teach—our curriculum), process (how we teach—our teaching methods), and structure (where we teach—our learning environments). In Chapter VI, I explored the first issue—what is missing from the content of our knowledge tradition. In Chapter III, I explored the second issue—process barriers that some learners face in due to the gendered philosophy of science and the ways in which certain learning styles are privileged over others. This chapter adds to the discussion of all three issues, but focuses primarily on the second and third—partnership methods of teaching and learning and how to create partnership learning environments. This chapter explores the following suggestions for shifting education (especially science and IT education) away from a dominator and towards a partnership model: (1) partnership ways of knowing; (2) considering the needs and perspectives of users and beneficiaries of science and IT in education; (3) educating teachers from kindergarten through college to better understand how our current system works as well as how to co-create partnership; (4) redefining student-teacher relationships in terms of partnership; (5) co-creating collaborative learning environments; (6) developing partnerships systems of testing, evaluating, and measuring learning; and (7) offering examples of partnership curricula and programs. In Chapter I, I contrasted the characteristics of dominator and partnership social systems. Table 1 describes the characteristics of partnership social systems that are particularly relevant to science and technology education as they relate to the topics covered in this chapter (Eisler, 1987, 2000, 2002, 2007; Eisler & Loye, 1990; Eisler & Miller, 2004).
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Objectives

This chapter aims to help you understand the following:

  • The core characteristics of a partnership social system that most closely relate to education as a social institution.

  • How to apply the values of a partnership society to reshape education as a social institution, especially the ways we learn and teacher-student relationships.

  • How examples of partnership curricula can help you envision education from new perspectives.

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Introduction

Ultimately, creating lasting and long-term change in the participation of women as developers, users, and beneficiaries of technology necessitates addressing this change in all of our social institutions. However, as the social institution that is given explicit responsibility for teaching the next generation of citizens, education holds particularly significant potential to be a positive force for change. We need a fundamental shift in the culture of science and IT away from its dominator roots to a partnership perspective, and we all (i.e., teachers, students, parents, business-owners, and citizens) need to co-create this change together.

In Tomorrow’s Children: A Blueprint for Partnership Education in the 21st Century, Riane Eisler (2000) calls for changes in content (what we teach—our curriculum), process (how we teach—our teaching methods), and structure (where we teach—our learning environments). In Chapter VI, I explored the first issue—what is missing from the content of our knowledge tradition. In Chapter III, I explored the second issue—process barriers that some learners face in due to the gendered philosophy of science and the ways in which certain learning styles are privileged over others. This chapter adds to the discussion of all three issues, but focuses primarily on the second and third—partnership methods of teaching and learning and how to create partnership learning environments.

This chapter explores the following suggestions for shifting education (especially science and IT education) away from a dominator and towards a partnership model: (1) partnership ways of knowing; (2) considering the needs and perspectives of users and beneficiaries of science and IT in education; (3) educating teachers from kindergarten through college to better understand how our current system works as well as how to co-create partnership; (4) redefining student-teacher relationships in terms of partnership; (5) co-creating collaborative learning environments; (6) developing partnerships systems of testing, evaluating, and measuring learning; and (7) offering examples of partnership curricula and programs. In Chapter I, I contrasted the characteristics of dominator and partnership social systems. Table 1 describes the characteristics of partnership social systems that are particularly relevant to science and technology education as they relate to the topics covered in this chapter (Eisler, 1987, 2000, 2002, 2007; Eisler & Loye, 1990; Eisler & Miller, 2004).

Complete Chapter List

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Table of Contents
Foreword
Riane Eisler
Preface
Mary Kirk
Acknowledgment
Mary Kirk
Chapter 1
Mary Kirk
One barrier to more people understanding the work of feminist scholars is a fallacious view of “feminism” that has transformed an entire area of... Sample PDF
Demyth-ifying Feminism: Reclaiming the “F” Word
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Chapter 2
Mary Kirk
Dualisms are a hallmark of dominator societies, and dualistic thinking is a deeplyembedded attitude that shapes our values and beliefs. The... Sample PDF
Dualisms and Stereotypes: Tools of Domination
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Chapter 3
Mary Kirk
This chapter explores the ways in which the dualistic notion of gender is at the core of many fundamental ideas in the philosophy of science. The... Sample PDF
Gendered Philosophy of Science: Science is Male, Nature is Female
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Chapter 4
Mary Kirk
Communication is generally understood as a two-part process consisting of messages that convey content and the interpretation of that content by the... Sample PDF
Mass Media as Social Institution: The Wired Example
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Chapter 5
Mary Kirk
Language as a social institution is the primary symbol system through which we teach/learn about our dominator culture. The assumptions, values... Sample PDF
Language as Social Institution: The Male-Centered IT Culture
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Chapter 6
Mary Kirk
Education is another of the primary social institutions from which we learn the values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of a dominator culture. A... Sample PDF
Education as Social Institution: Understanding Her-Story
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Chapter 7
Mary Kirk
The global IT business as a social institution reflects the same dominator values as other social institutions in the U.S. Since IT is a large and... Sample PDF
Business as Social Institution: Global Issues in IT
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Chapter 8
Mary Kirk
In Chapter IV, I discussed how language operates as a social institution to teach us the values, attitudes, and beliefs of our society. Our... Sample PDF
Partnership Language and Media: Creating a New IT Culture
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Chapter 9
Mary Kirk
Ultimately, creating lasting and long-term change in the participation of women as developers, users, and beneficiaries of technology necessitates... Sample PDF
Partnership Science and Technology Education
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Chapter 10
Mary Kirk
In Chapter VII, I asked how our knowledge about the dramatically unequal distribution of global income combined with the estimates on global... Sample PDF
Partnership Global IT Business
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Chapter 11
Mary Kirk
This book has offered one feminist’s perspective on how a deeper understanding of our dominator social system might clarify why women are... Sample PDF
A Concluding Pledge: With Technology and Justice for All
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