Persuasive Design

Persuasive Design

Per F.V. Hasle (Aalborg University, Denmark) and Christensen Anne-Kathrine Kjær (Aalborg University, Denmark)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-863-5.ch022
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Abstract

Persuasive design (PD) is concerned with the use of computing technology for persuasive purposes. It thereby captures a comprehensive and important trend in CMC, human-computer interaction, and software development in general. This chapter describes the basic concepts of PD as well as its development from its inception in the late 90s until now. So far, rhetoric has played a modest role in the field. However, it is shown that rhetoric offers a major step forward in consolidating PD as a discipline. The concepts of PD in many respects have a theoretical basis in and are better understood with reference to rhetoric; a number of practical guidelines for PD can and should be developed on the basis of rhetoric; and ‘epistemic rhetoric’ offers a sound epistemology for PD, which is at the moment lacking. Arguably, a rhetorical turn is required for coming to grips with the problem of defining PD and placing it properly as a special case of CMC, namely computer mediated persuasion.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Macrosuasion: A term for processes (especially computer-mediated processes) which have a general persuasive purpose, and which have been developed or initiated for that very purpose. Sometimes also used to designate the result of such processes.

Persuasive Design: The discipline concerned with how to analyze, design, and develop computer-mediated persuasion.

Persuasive Appeals: The three persuasive strategies of classical rhetoric: the appeal to reason (logos), the appeal to emotions (pathos), and the appeal aimed at creating credibility of the speaker (ethos).

Microsuasion: A term for persuasive techniques (especially computerized techniques) that can be used in the course of an overall process, which may or may not be cases of macrosuasion (qv.). Sometimes also used to designate the result of such techniques.

Persuasive Technology: Technology developed according to the principles of Persuasive design. Sometimes used as another name for Persuasive design.

Microsuasion: A term for persuasive techniques (especially computerized techniques) that can be used in the course of an overall process, which may or may not be cases of macrosuasion (qv.). Sometimes also used to designate the result of such techniques.

Epistemic Rhetoric: A modern term designating a conception of rhetoric that emphasizes its epistemological aspects. In epistemic rhetoric, persuasion is seen as the result of not just presentation (form and style) but also content. While the term is modern this point of view is clearly represented in classical rhetoric, too.

Macrosuasion: A term for processes (especially computer-mediated processes) which have a general persuasive purpose, and which have been developed or initiated for that very purpose. Sometimes also used to designate the result of such processes.

Captology: Another name for persuasive design.

Persuasive Appeals: The three persuasive strategies of classical rhetoric: the appeal to reason (logos), the appeal to emotions (pathos), and the appeal aimed at creating credibility of the speaker (ethos).

Persuasive Technology: Technology developed according to the principles of Persuasive design. Sometimes used as another name for Persuasive design.

Persuasive Design: The discipline concerned with how to analyze, design, and develop computer-mediated persuasion.

Epistemic Rhetoric: A modern term designating a conception of rhetoric that emphasizes its epistemological aspects. In epistemic rhetoric, persuasion is seen as the result of not just presentation (form and style) but also content. While the term is modern this point of view is clearly represented in classical rhetoric, too.

Captology: Another name for persuasive design.

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