Publishing an Internet E-Zine

Publishing an Internet E-Zine

Joseph E. Burns (Southeastern Louisiana University, USA) and Dianna Laurent (Southeastern Louisiana University, USA)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 12
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-863-5.ch027
OnDemand PDF Download:
$37.50

Abstract

An e-zine is defined as an online version of a magazine most often offered to the audience of an existing Web site. E-zines should strive to follow the conventions of traditional magazines, being delivered to a subscriber base on a regular timetable and offering multiple articles per issue. Advertising should be minimal, and only those persons who sign up should receive the e-zine. Where an e-zine will differ from a traditional magazine is in its relationship with the Web site that offers it. Each issue should work in tandem with its Web site. The e-zine should not only offer new information, but should also act as a reminder to the reader to visit the parent Web site by offering links to recently updated pages and new information. E-zines are almost exclusively delivered to a subscriber base through e-mail. Therefore, the e-zine publisher must test content against e-mail spam filters to assure delivery.

Key Terms in this Chapter

E-Zine: This is a shortened, Internet title for an online magazine. It is generally an e-mail offering multiple articles on a single topic area delivered to a subscriber base. Often an e-zine is offered by a Web site as a method of subdividing its audience into smaller, more topic-specific groups in order to offer both targeted content and advertising. Where an e-zine differs from a newsletter is its adherence to traditional magazine conventions.

Subscriber Base: A subscriber base in terms of an e-zine is a smaller portion of a Web site’s existing audience. e-zines are mainly offered to a Web site’s audience through a subscriber page. Interested persons can visit the page and provide an e-mail address in order to receive the Web site’s e-zine. Larger Web sites will often offer multiple e-zines covering different topics. The purpose is to further subdivide the Web site audience in order to be able to better target information and advertising.

Newsletter: Newsletters are information delivered via e-mail much like e-zines. Generally, what sets an e-zine apart from a newsletter is a more formal adherence to magazine conventions and a more regulated schedule of delivery. However, there are no set rules to exactly what defines a newsletter and an e-zine. To many, the terms are interchangeable.

Convention: A convention is a generally accepted idea of how something should be presented. In terms of an e-zine, conventions created through traditional magazines are followed. Those conventions include, but are not limited to, offering the e-zine on a regular basis either weekly or monthly, multiple articles per issue, targeted advertising, and a subscriber base.

Newsletter: Newsletters are information delivered via e-mail much like e-zines. Generally, what sets an e-zine apart from a newsletter is a more formal adherence to magazine conventions and a more regulated schedule of delivery. However, there are no set rules to exactly what defines a newsletter and an e-zine. To many, the terms are interchangeable.

Spam: This is any unwanted e-mail. The term comes from a Monty Python sketch where “spam” is repeated well over 200 times.

Spam Filter: This is a piece of software that “reads” incoming e-mail looking for spam trigger words. Spam filters often allow users to set levels of protection. A higher setting means the user wants less spam but it also means the spam filter becomes very sensitive to any spam trigger often deleting wanted e-mail. Lower settings allow more e-mail to get through forcing the filter to only eliminate blatant spam e-mails.

Spam Trigger: Many Internet service providers and e-mail clients offer software intended to stop an unwanted e-mail before it reaches the user’s mailbox. A “spam trigger” is a word, phrase, or character that suggests an e-mail may be spam thus triggering the anti-spam software.

Spam Filter: This is a piece of software that “reads” incoming e-mail looking for spam trigger words. Spam filters often allow users to set levels of protection. A higher setting means the user wants less spam but it also means the spam filter becomes very sensitive to any spam trigger often deleting wanted e-mail. Lower settings allow more e-mail to get through forcing the filter to only eliminate blatant spam e-mails.

Spam: This is any unwanted e-mail. The term comes from a Monty Python sketch where “spam” is repeated well over 200 times.

Convention: A convention is a generally accepted idea of how something should be presented. In terms of an e-zine, conventions created through traditional magazines are followed. Those conventions include, but are not limited to, offering the e-zine on a regular basis either weekly or monthly, multiple articles per issue, targeted advertising, and a subscriber base.

Spam Trigger: Many Internet service providers and e-mail clients offer software intended to stop an unwanted e-mail before it reaches the user’s mailbox. A “spam trigger” is a word, phrase, or character that suggests an e-mail may be spam thus triggering the anti-spam software.

E-Zine: This is a shortened, Internet title for an online magazine. It is generally an e-mail offering multiple articles on a single topic area delivered to a subscriber base. Often an e-zine is offered by a Web site as a method of subdividing its audience into smaller, more topic-specific groups in order to offer both targeted content and advertising. Where an e-zine differs from a newsletter is its adherence to traditional magazine conventions.

Subscriber Base: A subscriber base in terms of an e-zine is a smaller portion of a Web site’s existing audience. e-zines are mainly offered to a Web site’s audience through a subscriber page. Interested persons can visit the page and provide an e-mail address in order to receive the Web site’s e-zine. Larger Web sites will often offer multiple e-zines covering different topics. The purpose is to further subdivide the Web site audience in order to be able to better target information and advertising.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset