Technology Development and Innovative Practice

Technology Development and Innovative Practice

Robert S. Friedman (New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA), Desiree M. Roberts (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY, USA) and Jonathan D. Linton (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-038-7.ch003
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Abstract

This chapter on innovative practice supporting technological development has several thematic overlays that show some consistency in terms of patterns, but also some diversity in terms of strategies that researchers have employed in this area. Beginning with Hage and Aiken’s (1969) seminal work on routinization and how the social structures of organizations affect technological development and innovation, readers will see two general trends in terms of approach: the statistical and the sociological. Whether it is Aldrich’s (1972) use of path analysis to study the nature and effects of organizational variables on innovative practice, or Rothwell et al.’s (1974) identification of innovation success factors, or Downs and Mohr’s (1976) defining of innovation through factors of variability, quantitative methods are shown to be increasingly powerful tools in identifying the nature of innovation and technology development. Nelson and Winter (1977) continue in this vein by establishing an inclusive theoretical structure for innovation, Dewar and Hage (1978) identify variables of structural differentiation and complexity that affect this domain, and Kimberly and Evanisko (1981) suggest variables to follow that come from both within individual organization units and their wider contexts. Pavitt (1984) uses sectoral pattern analysis to describe how a combination of technology sources, user requirements, and potential technology appropriation affect how we understand technical change and the structural relationships between technology and industry. Fisher and Fry (1971) end the quantitatively based section with a discussion of their substitution forecasting model.
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Introduction

This chapter on innovative practice supporting technological development has several thematic overlays that show some consistency in terms of patterns, but also some diversity in terms of strategies that researchers have employed in this area. Beginning with Hage and Aiken’s (1969) seminal work on routinization and how the social structures of organizations affect technological development and innovation, readers will see two general trends in terms of approach: the statistical and the sociological. Whether it is Aldrich’s (1972) use of path analysis to study the nature and effects of organizational variables on innovative practice, or Rothwell et al.’s (1974) identification of innovation success factors, or Downs and Mohr’s (1976) defining of innovation through factors of variability, quantitative methods are shown to be increasingly powerful tools in identifying the nature of innovation and technology development. Nelson and Winter (1977) continue in this vein by establishing an inclusive theoretical structure for innovation, Dewar and Hage (1978) identify variables of structural differentiation and complexity that affect this domain, and Kimberly and Evanisko (1981) suggest variables to follow that come from both within individual organization units and their wider contexts. Pavitt (1984) uses sectoral pattern analysis to describe how a combination of technology sources, user requirements, and potential technology appropriation affect how we understand technical change and the structural relationships between technology and industry. Fisher and Fry (1971) end the quantitatively based section with a discussion of their substitution forecasting model.

From a more qualitative orientation, Abernathy and Clark (1985) introduce “transilience,” or a set of categories of technological change that is aligned with evolutionary developments that are altered by varying managerial environments. Anderson and Tushman (1990) continue on the evolutionary track with an explanation of their cyclical model of technological change. Their model shares some basic affinities with Clark’s (1985) evolutionary based view of technological change shaped by customer demands. Barley (1986, 1990) presents two sociologically oriented sets of ideas, one examining patterns of action and interaction, and the other presenting the benefits of examining the interaction between social action and social form in technologically innovative organizations. Dosi (1982), concluding this chapter, invokes the Kuhnian paradigm to demonstrate the strength of identifying patterns of continuous changes and moments of discontinuity in technologically innovative environments.

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Table of Contents
Foreword
Steve Walsh
Acknowledgment
Chapter 1
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This book differs from other academic works on the management of technology and innovation because it focuses on the seminal research of the field.... Sample PDF
Introduction to the Field of Technology Innovation Management
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Chapter 2
R&D Process Models  (pages 31-54)
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This chapter on research and development processes and models begins with a section concerning the economics and finance of R&D. Liberatore and... Sample PDF
R&D Process Models
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Chapter 3
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This chapter on innovative practice supporting technological development has several thematic overlays that show some consistency in terms of... Sample PDF
Technology Development and Innovative Practice
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Chapter 4
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This chapter discusses how information that supports innovation flows throughout an organization, the construction and effects of team composition... Sample PDF
Social Influence and Human Interaction with Technology
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Chapter 5
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This chapter introduces the seminal literature addressing technological diffusion, innovative product diversification, and the organizational... Sample PDF
Diffusion and Innovation: An Organizational Perspective
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Chapter 6
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
This chapter on the role of knowledge in the operation of organizations consists of two main thrusts: the effects of knowledge (accrual... Sample PDF
Knowledge and Change in Organizations
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Chapter 7
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
There are three dominant themes that run through this chapter on organizational innovation strategy: the rate and nature of change; attitudes... Sample PDF
Organizational Innovation Strategy
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Chapter 8
New Product Development  (pages 192-215)
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
The articles addressed in this chapter on new product development can be classified in two general categories—papers that address the internal... Sample PDF
New Product Development
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Chapter 9
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
In this chapter on information and communication technology management, we retain a chronological order to emphasize the development of research... Sample PDF
Information and Communication Technology Management
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Chapter 10
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
It is beyond question how ubiquitous and powerful computing has become for commerce, communication, and culture. As the articles addressed in this... Sample PDF
Open Source and Software Development Innovation
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Chapter 11
Robert S. Friedman, Desiree M. Roberts, Jonathan D. Linton
Although the goal of this book is to provide foundational knowledge through indepth consideration of the seminal literature in the technology... Sample PDF
Directions in the Field of Technology Innovation Management
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About the Authors