Web Accessibility at University Libraries and Library Schools: 2002 Follow-Up Study

Web Accessibility at University Libraries and Library Schools: 2002 Follow-Up Study

Axel Schmetzke (University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, USA)
Copyright: © 2003 |Pages: 45
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-107-0.ch008
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Abstract

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that library programs and services must be accessible to people with disabilities. In an era in which much information resides in digitized form on the World Wide Web, the ADA’s mandate must be interpreted as applying not only to physical space but also to cyberspace. Just as in the physical world, proper design is a crucial issue. Only accessibly-designed Web pages ensure that all people, including those with print disabilities, have access to Web-based information. Previous studies indicate that a large proportion of campus, as well at the main libraries on these campuses. This study looks at all 56 North American ALA-accredited schools of library and information science (SLIS), as well at the main libraries on these campuses. Accessibility data collected in February 2002 are compared to 2000 data. The findings continue to give cause for concern: It is reasonable to assume that low Web page accessibility at the nation’s library schools reflects a lack of awareness about this issue among the leaders and trainers in the library profession.

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