A Web-Based 3D Real Time Oscilloscope Experiment

A Web-Based 3D Real Time Oscilloscope Experiment

Chi Chung Ko (National University of Singapore, Singapore) and Chang Dong Cheng (CCS Automation PTE LTD, Singapore)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-789-8.ch013
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Abstract

In this final chapter, we will describe the use of Java 3D as a visualization technology in the development of a Web-based 3D real time oscilloscope experiment. Developed and launched under a research project at the National University of Singapore, this application enables students to carry out a physical electronic experiment that involves the use of an actual oscilloscope, a signal generator and a circuit board remotely through the Internet (Ko 2000, and 2001). Specifically, this system addresses 3D visualization schemes on the client side (Bund, 2005, Hobona, 2006, Liang, 2006, Ueda, 2006, Wang, 2006), as well as Web-based real time control and 3D-based monitoring between the client and server (Nielsen, 2006; Qin, Harrison, West, & Wright, 2004). The control of the various instruments are carried out in real time through the use of a Java 3D based interface on the client side, with the results of the experiment being also reflected or displayed appropriately on 3D instruments in the same interface.
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Introduction

In this final chapter, we will describe the use of Java 3D as a visualization technology in the development of a Web-based 3D real time oscilloscope experiment.

Developed and launched under a research project at the National University of Singapore, this application enables students to carry out a physical electronic experiment that involves the use of an actual oscilloscope, a signal generator and a circuit board remotely through the Internet (Ko 2000, and 2001). Specifically, this system addresses 3D visualization schemes on the client side (Bund, 2005, Hobona, 2006, Liang, 2006, Ueda, 2006, Wang, 2006), as well as Web-based real time control and 3D-based monitoring between the client and server (Nielsen, 2006; Qin, Harrison, West, & Wright, 2004).

The control of the various instruments are carried out in real time through the use of a Java 3D based interface on the client side, with the results of the experiment being also reflected or displayed appropriately on 3D instruments in the same interface.

Basically, Java 3D is used to create a virtual 3D world or room in which the 3D instruments reside. The mouse is used for both navigation in this world as well as to operate the instruments through, say, dragging a sliding control or a rotary control or clicking or switching appropriate buttons on the instruments. Associated commands that cause the real instruments in a remote physical laboratory to operate accordingly are then sent through the Internet in real-time. Experimental results corresponding to, say, a change in the real oscilloscope display, are then sent from the instrument control server back to the Java 3D client to result in a real-time change in the display of the virtual 3D oscilloscope in the virtual 3D world.

Figures 1 and 2 show some screen capture of the application. Specifically, Figure 1 shows the initial scene of the virtual laboratory room for carrying out the experiment. Note that the experiment and apparatus are inside the room and the user has to make use of the navigational controls at the bottom of the screen to “walk” toward the room and open the door after typing an user access password. The bottom rightmost control allows the user to make turns in four possible directions, while a similarly shaped adjacent control on the left allows the user to move linearly. These controls are custom designed for the application and can be activated by using just the mouse, even though keyboard activation is also possible. While this adds an additional level of complexity to the interface and makes it more difficult to develop the program, it is felt to be essential for the users who are primarily students with no experience in using a 3D-based software.

Figure 1

Virtual room in the real-time oscilloscope experiment

Figure 2.

Virtual instruments in the real-time oscilloscope experiment

Complete Chapter List

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Table of Contents
Preface
Chi Chung Ko
Chapter 1
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
Web-based virtual reality is fast becoming an important application and technological tools in the next generation of games and simulation as well... Sample PDF
Virtual Reality and Java 3D
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Chapter 2
Java 3D Overview  (pages 18-31)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
In the last chapter, a brief introduction on the creation of 3D content through the use of Java 3D and other programming methodologies for virtual... Sample PDF
Java 3D Overview
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Chapter 3
Geometry Objects  (pages 32-74)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
To create 3D graphics, we have to build graphics or visual objects and position them appropriately in a virtual scene. In general, there are three... Sample PDF
Geometry Objects
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Chapter 4
Appearance Objects  (pages 75-96)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
In the last chapter, the creation of the skeletons or shapes of 3D objects has been discussed through the use of geometry objects in Java 3D. In... Sample PDF
Appearance Objects
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Chapter 5
Textures  (pages 97-113)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
Although extensive use of basic attributes such as color and material will be able to make an object realistic to the human user, it will be time... Sample PDF
Textures
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Chapter 6
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
How the properties of virtual 3D objects can be specified and defined has been discussed in earlier chapters. However, how a certain virtual object... Sample PDF
Lighting, Fog, and Background
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Chapter 7
Animation Objects  (pages 132-158)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
We have discussed important Java 3D objects that are basically static in the last few chapters. Starting from this chapter, we will be looking at... Sample PDF
Animation Objects
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Chapter 8
Interaction  (pages 159-187)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
In Chapter VII, we discussed how animation can be applied in Java 3D to increase the visual impact of a virtual 3D world and illustrate the dynamic... Sample PDF
Interaction
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Chapter 9
Picking  (pages 188-216)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
The last two chapters have discussed how animation and interaction can be created in Java 3D to increase visual impact, to show object dynamics and... Sample PDF
Picking
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Chapter 10
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
One of the most useful and important advantages of 3D graphics rendering and applications is that there is the possibility for the user to navigate... Sample PDF
Navigation, Input Devices, and Collision
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Chapter 11
Multiple Views  (pages 238-263)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
Our discussions in previous chapters have centered on the creation and interaction of visual objects in a virtual 3D world. The objects and scenes... Sample PDF
Multiple Views
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Chapter 12
Audio  (pages 264-275)
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
Of all the human perceptions, two of the most important ones are perhaps vision and sound, for which we have developed highly specialized sensors... Sample PDF
Audio
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Chapter 13
Chi Chung Ko, Chang Dong Cheng
In this final chapter, we will describe the use of Java 3D as a visualization technology in the development of a Web-based 3D real time oscilloscope... Sample PDF
A Web-Based 3D Real Time Oscilloscope Experiment
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Appendix A: Downloading Software
Appendix B: Running the Rotating Cube Program
Appendix C: ViewManager
Appendix D: Main Applet for Web-Based 3D Experiment
Appendix E: Scene Graph Implementation for Web-Based 3D Experiment
Appendix F: Knob Class for Web-Based 3D Experiment
Appendix G: Navigation and Collision Detection for Web-Based 3D Experiment
Appendix H: Picking for Web-Based 3D Experiment
Appendix I: Program Summary and Screen Capture
About the Authors