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Journal Contents: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning (IJMBL)

View the International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning (IJMBL) home page for complete details.
Volume 6 (2014)
Issue 1
1.
Using Smartphone Technology in Environmental Sustainability Education: The Case of the Maasai Mara Region in Kenya (pages 1-16)
James Dogbey (Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA), Cassie Quigley (Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA), Megan Che (Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA) and Jeffrey Hallo (Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA)
2.
Providing Simulated Online and Mobile Learning Experiences in a Prison Education Setting: Lessons Learned from the PLEIADES Pilot Project (pages 17-32)
Helen Farley (University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia), Angela Murphy (University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia) and Tasman Bedford (University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia)
3.
Blended Course Design: Where's the Pedagogy? (pages 33-55)
Patricia McGee (University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA)
4.
Analyzing the Effects of Context-Aware Mobile Design Principles on Student Learning (pages 56-70)
Eric Seneca (Our Lady of the Lake College, Baton Rouge, LA, USA)
Issue 2
1.
A Historical Materialist Analysis of the Debate in Swedish Print Media on Mobile Phones in School Settings (pages 1-14)
Torbjörn Ott (University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden)
2.
Implementing Linguistic Landscape investigations with M-learning for Intercultural Competence Development (pages 15-25)
Jacek Tadeusz Waliński (Institute of English Studies, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland)
3.
Mobile Learning in Secondary Education: Teachers' and Students' Perceptions And Acceptance Of Tablet Computers (pages 26-40)
Hannelore Montrieux (Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Cédric Courtois (iMinds Research Group for Media and ICT, Department of Communication Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Frederik De Grove (iMinds Research Group for Media and ICT, Department of Communication Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Annelies Raes (Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Tammy Schellens (Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium) and Lieven De Marez (iMinds Research Group for Media and ICT, Department of Communication Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium)
4.
‘Talking Tools': Sloyd Processes Become Multimodal Stories with Smartphone Documentation (pages 41-57)
Annika Wiklund-Engblom (MediaCity, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland), Kasper Hiltunen (Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland), Juha Hartvik (Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland), Mia Porko-Hudd (Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland) and Marléne Johansson (Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland)
5.
LingoBee: Engaging Mobile Language Learners Through Crowd-Sourcing (pages 58-73)
Sobah Abbas Petersen (SINTEF Technology and Society, Trondheim, Norway), Emma Procter-Legg (Study Group, Bellerbys College, Oxford, UK) and Annamaria Cacchione (Department of Social Science and Linguistic Centre, University of Molise, Camobasso, Italy)
Volume 5 (2013)
Issue 1
1.
Conceptualising mLearning Literacy (pages 1-20)
Wan Ng (School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia)
2.
A Methodology for Enhancing Mobile Learning Through Content Semantics (pages 21-38)
Glaroudis Dimitrios (Department of Applied Informatics, University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece), Manitsaris Athanasios (Department of Applied Informatics, University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece) and Kotini Isabella (Department of Applied Informatics, University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece)
3.
A Numerical Methods Course Based on B-Learning: Integrated Learning Design and Follow Up (pages 39-57)
Francisco Javier Delgado Cepeda (Department of Physics and Mathematics, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Estado de Mexico, Atizapan, Estado de Mexico, Mexico)
4.
Development of a Browser-Based Mobile Audience Response System for Large Classrooms (pages 58-76)
Monika Andergassen (Institute of Information Systems and New Media, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria), Victor Guerra (Institute of Information Systems and New Media, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria), Karl Ledermüller (Evaluation & Quality Enhancement, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria) and Gustaf Neumann (Institute of Information Systems and New Media, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria)
Issue 2
1.
An Interactive Mobile Lecturing Model: Enhancing Student Engagement with Face-To-Face Sessions (pages 1-21)
Olutayo Boyinbode (University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa), Dick Ng’ambi (Centre for Educational Technology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa) and Antoine Bagula (Department of Computer Science, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa)
2.
Journalism 2.0: Exploring the Impact of Mobile and Social Media on Journalism Education (pages 22-38)
Thomas Cochrane (Centre for Learning and Teaching (CfLAT), Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand), Helen Sissons (School of Communication Studies, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand), Danni Mulrennan (Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) and Richard Pamatatau (School of Communication Studies, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand)
3.
Blended Learning in Personalized Assistive Learning Environments (pages 39-59)
Catherine Marinagi (Department of Logistics, Technological Educational Institute of Chalkis, Thiva, Greece) and Christos Skourlas (Department of Informatics, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens, Greece)
4.
Measuring the Difficult to Measure: Teaching and Learning with an iPad (pages 60-77)
Jace Hargis (Abu Dhabi Women’s College (ADWC), Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT), Abu Dhabi, UAE), Cathy Cavanaugh (Abu Dhabi Women’s College (ADWC), Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT), Abu Dhabi, UAE), Tayeb Kamali (Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT), Abu Dhabi, UAE) and Melissa Soto (University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA)
5.
‘It’s Almost like Talking to a Person’: Student Disclosure to Pedagogical Agents in Sensitive Settings (pages 78-93)
Maggi Savin-Baden (Coventry University, Coventry, England, UK), Gemma Tombs (Coventry University, Coventry, England, UK), David Burden (Daden, Birmingham, England, UK) and Clare Wood (Coventry University, Coventry, England, UK)
Issue 3
1.
Teaching Practices in iPad-Classrooms: Alignment of Didactical Designs, Mobile Devices and Creativity (pages 1-16)
Isa Jahnke (Department of Applied Educational Science, Devision Interactive Media & Learning (IML), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden)
2.
Empowering Creativity in Young People Through Mobile Learning: An Investigation of Creative Practices of Mobile Media Uses In and Out of School (pages 17-33)
M. Ranieri (Department of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy) and I. Bruni (Department of Communication and Social Research, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy)
3.
Creativity and Mobile Language Learning Using LingoBee (pages 34-51)
Sobah Abbas Petersen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway), Emma Procter-Legg (Study Group, Bellerbys College, Oxford, UK) and Annamaria Cacchione (Department of Social Science and Linguistic Centre, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy)
4.
Supporting Creativity in Craft Brewing: A Case Study of iPhone Use in the Transition from Novice towards Mastery (pages 52-67)
Steve Wright (Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK), Ben Short (School of Health Sciences, University of Salford, Salford, UK) and Gale Parchoma (Faculty of Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada)
5.
Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies for Novice Users of Mobile Technologies (pages 68-79)
Jennifer Masters (La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia)
Issue 4
1.
Post-Web 2.0 Pedagogy: From Student-Generated Content to International Co-Production Enabled by Mobile Social Media (pages 1-18)
Thomas Cochrane (AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand), Laurent Antonczak (AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand) and Daniel Wagner (Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand)
2.
Use of Mobile Applications for Hospital Discharge Letters: Improving Handover at Point of Practice (pages 19-42)
Bridget Maher (University College Cork (UCC), Cork, Ireland), Hendrik Drachsler (Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC), Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands), Marco Kalz (Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC), Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands), Cathal Hoare (University College Cork (UCC), Cork, Ireland), Humphrey Sorensen (University College Cork (UCC), Cork, Ireland), Leonardo Lezcano (Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC), Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands), Pat Henn (University College Cork (UCC), Cork, Ireland) and Marcus Specht (Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC), Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands)
3.
Augmented Reality and Mobile Learning: The State of the Art (pages 43-58)
Elizabeth FitzGerald (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), Rebecca Ferguson (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), Anne Adams (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), Mark Gaved (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), Yishay Mor (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK) and Rhodri Thomas (Learning and Teaching Systems, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK)
4.
A Learning Outcome-Oriented Approach towards Classifying Pervasive Games for Learning using Game Design Patterns and Contextual Information (pages 59-71)
Birgit Schmitz (Welten Institute, Research Center for Learning, Teaching and Technology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands), Roland Klemke (Welten Institute, Research Center for Learning, Teaching and Technology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands) and Marcus Specht (Welten Institute, Research Center for Learning, Teaching and Technology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands)
5.
Systematising the Field of Mobile Assisted Language Learning (pages 72-90)
Olga Viberg (Örebro University Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden) and Åke Grönlund (Örebro University Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden)
Volume 4 (2012)
Issue 1
1.
From ‘Posh Pen and Pad’ to Participatory Pedagogies: One Story of a Netbook Implementation Project with 108 Pupils in Two Primary Schools (pages 1-17)
Karl Royle (University of Wolverhampton, UK) and Mark Hadfield (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
2.
The Perceptions of Health and Social Care Students of using Mobile 360 Degree Performance Feedback Tools in Practice Placement Settings (pages 18-30)
J. D. Taylor (Leeds Metropolitan University, UK), C. A. Dearnley (University of Bradford, UK,), J. C. Laxton (University of Leeds, UK), I. Nkosana-Nyawata (University of Huddersfield, UK) and S. Rinomhota (University of Leeds, UK)
3.
Developing Web Prototypes for Mobile-Learning Design Research (pages 31-44)
Alan Foley (Syracuse University, USA) and Heng Luo (Syracuse University, USA)
4.
Six Scenarios of Exploiting an Ontology Based, Mobilized Learning Environment (pages 45-60)
Gábor Kismihók (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary), Ildikó Szabó (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary) and Réka Vas (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary)
Issue 2
1.
Smartphone-Based Mobile Learning with Physician Trainees in Botswana (pages 1-14)
Aileen Y. Chang (University of Pennsylvania, USA and Botswana-UPenn Partnership, Botswana), Ryan Littman-Quinn (Botswana-UPenn Partnership, Botswana), Dineo Ketshogileng (University of Botswana, Botswana), Amit Chandra (University of Botswana, Botswana), Taatske Rijken (University of Botswana, Botswana), Sankalpo Ghose (Botswana-UPenn Partnership, Botswana), Andrea Kyer (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Anne K. Seymour (University of Pennsylvania, USA and Botswana-UPenn Partnership, Botswana) and Carrie L. Kovarik (University of Pennsylvania, USA and Botswana-UPenn Partnership, Botswana)
2.
Dr Math: A Mobile Scaffolding Environment (pages 15-29)
A.Botha (CSIR Meraka Institute, South Africa) and L. Butgereit (CSIR Meraka Institute, South Africa)
3.
Motivations for Play in the UFractions Mobile Game in Three Countries (pages 30-48)
Eeva Nygren (University of Eastern Finland, Finland), Erkki Sutinen (University of Eastern Finland, Finland), A. Seugnet Blignaut (North West University Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa), Teemu H. Laine (University of Eastern Finland, Finland) and Christo J. Els (North West University Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa)
4.
Social Media-Enhanced Phones for Productive Learning of South African Postgraduate Students (pages 49-66)
Patient Rambe (University of the Free State, South Africa)
5.
Using a Participatory Action Research Approach to Design a Lecture Podcasting System (pages 67-86)
Raymond Mugwanya (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Gary Marsden (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Dick Ng’ambi (University of Cape Town, South Africa) and John Traxler (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
Issue 3
1.
Design and Evaluation of a Project-Based Learning Ubiquitous Platform for Universal Client: PBL2U (pages 1-15)
Sam Rottenberg (Télécom SudParis, France), Claire Lecocq (Télécom SudParis, France) and Sébastien Leriche (Télécom SudParis, France)
2.
Student Experiences with Mobile Electronic Updates from a Virtual Learning Environment (pages 16-33)
Laura Crane (Lancaster University, UK), Phillip Benachour (Lancaster University, UK) and Paul Coulton (Lancaster University, UK)
3.
Designing a Mobile Application for Conceptual Understanding: Integrating Learning Theory with Organic Chemistry Learning Needs (pages 34-52)
Sonal Dekhane (Georgia Gwinnett College, USA) and Mai Yin Tsoi (Georgia Gwinnett College, USA)
4.
Designing Pedagogical Models for Tourism Education: Focus on Work-Based Mobile Learning (pages 53-67)
Hanna Vuojärvi (University of Lapland, Finland), Miikka Eriksson (University of Lapland, Finland) and Heli Ruokamo (University of Lapland, Finland)
Issue 4
1.
Mathematics Students’ Readiness for Mobile Learning (pages 1-20)
Ahmad Abu-Al-Aish (Department of Mathematical Sciences, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK), Steve Love (Department of Information Systems and Computing, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK) and Ziad Hunaiti (Knowledge Well Group Limited, Chelmsford, Essex, UK)
2.
“M-Learning Not an Extension of E-Learning”: Based on a Case Study of Moodle VLE (pages 21-33)
K. P. Hewagamage (School of Computing, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka), W.M.A.S.B. Wickramasinghe (School of Computing, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka) and A. De S. Jayatilaka (B. School of Computing, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka)
3.
Merging MOOC and mLearning for Increased Learner Interactions (pages 34-46)
Inge de Waard (Athabasca University, Antwerpen, Belgium), Apostolos Koutropoulos (Department of Applied Linguistics, University of Massachusetts-Boston, Boston, MA, USA), Rebecca J. Hogue (University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada), Sean C. Abajian (California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA, USA), Nilgün Özdamar Keskin (Department of Distance Education, Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Eskisehir Province, Turkey), C. Osvaldo Rodriguez (Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Michael Sean Gallagher (Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh, Newington, Edinburgh, UK)
4.
Incidental Second Language Vocabulary Learning from Reading Novels: A Comparison of Three Mobile Modes (pages 47-61)
Tony Fisher (School of Education, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK), Mike Sharples (Institute of Education Technology, Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), Richard Pemberton (School of Education University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK), Hiroaki Ogata (Department of Information Science and Intelligent Systems, University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan), Noriko Uosaki (University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan), Phil Edmonds (Sharp Labs Europe, Oxford, UK), Anthony Hull (Sharp Labs Europe, Oxford, UK) and Patrick Tschorn (Sharp Labs Europe, Oxford, UK)
Volume 3 (2011)
Issue 1
1.
A Survey of Research Methods and Purposes in Mobile Learning (pages 1-17)
Anna Wingkvist (Linnaeus University, Sweden) and Morgan Ericsson (Uppsala University, Sweden)
2.
Mature Students Using Mobile Devices in Life and Learning (pages 18-52)
Agnes Kukulska-Hulme (The Open University, UK), John Pettit (The Open University, UK), Linda Bradley (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Ana A. Carvalho (University of Minho, Portugal), Anthony Herrington (Curtin University, Australia), David M. Kennedy (University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) and Aisha Walker (University of Leeds, UK)
3.
4.
Advancing Collaboration between M-Learning Researchers and Practitioners through an Online Portal and Web 2.0 Technologies (pages 64-72)
Laurel Evelyn Dyson (University of Technology Sydney, Australia) and Andrew Litchfield (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)
5.
Empirical Research on Learners’ Thoughts About the Impact of Mobile Technology on Learning (pages 73-88)
Gábor Kismihók (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary) and Réka Vas (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary)
Issue 2
1.
Mobile Devices as Support Rather than Distraction for Mobile Learners: Evaluating Guidelines for Design (pages 1-15)
Johan Eliasson (Stockholm University, Sweden), Teresa Cerratto Pargman (Stockholm University, Sweden), Jalal Nouri (Stockholm University, Sweden), Daniel Spikol (Linnaeus University, Sweden) and Robert Ramberg (Stockholm University, Sweden)
2.
Identifying the Potential of Mobile Phone Cameras in Science Teaching and Learning: A Case Study Undertaken in Sri Lanka (pages 16-30)
Sakunthala Ekanayake (University of Bristol, UK) and Jocelyn Wishart (University of Bristol, UK)
3.
Audio Active: Discovering Mobile Learner-Gatherers from Across the Formal-Informal Continuum (pages 31-42)
Andrew Middleton (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)
4.
Involving the End-Users in the Development of Language Learning Material (pages 43-56)
Anu Seisto (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland), Maija Federley (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland), Timo Kuula (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland), Janne Paavilainen (University of Tampere, Finland) and Sami Vihavainen (Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland)
5.
Research Essay: Mobile Learning (pages 57-67)
John Traxler (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
Issue 3
1.
Reflections on 4 Years of mLearning Implementation (2007-2010) (pages 1-22)
Thomas Cochrane (Unitec, New Zealand)
2.
Listening to an Educational Podcast While Walking or Jogging: Can Students Really Multitask? (pages 23-33)
Joke Coens (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Kulak, Belgium), Ellen Degryse (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Kulak, Belgium), Marie-Paul Senecaut (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Kulak, Belgium), Jorge Cottyn (Katholieke Hogeschool Zuid-West-Vlaanderen, Belgium) and Geraldine Clarebout (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Kulak, Belgium)
3.
Mobile Technology and Student Learning: What Does Current Research Reveal? (pages 34-42)
Pamela Pollara (Louisiana State University, USA) and Kelly Kee Broussard (Louisiana State University, USA)
4.
5.
An Investigation Into Mobile Learning for High School Mathematics (pages 59-76)
Vani Kalloo (The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago) and Permanand Mohan (The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago)
Issue 4
1.
Unearthing Invisible Buildings: Device Focus and Device Sharing in a Collaborative Mobile Learning Activity (pages 1-18)
Marcus Winter (University of Brighton, UK) and Lyn Pemberton (University of Brighton, UK)
2.
The Role of Gender in Mobile Game-Based Learning (pages 19-37)
Susan Gwee (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), Yam San Chee (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and Ek Ming Tan (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
3.
Empirical Research into Students’ Mobile Phones and their Use for Learning (pages 38-53)
Claire Bradley (London Metropolitan University, UK) and Debbie Holley (Anglia Ruskin University, UK)
4.
Exploring the Challenges of Supporting Collaborative Mobile Learning (pages 54-69)
Jalal Nouri (Stockholm University, Sweden), Teresa Cerratto-Pargman (Stockholm University, Sweden), Johan Eliasson (Stockholm University, Sweden) and Robert Ramberg (Stockholm University, Sweden)
5.
Guidelines for the Design of Location-Based Audio for Mobile Learning (pages 70-85)
Elizabeth FitzGerald (University of Nottingham, UK), Mike Sharples (University of Nottingham, UK), Robert Jones (University of Nottingham, UK) and Gary Priestnall (University of Nottingham, UK)
Volume 2 (2010)
Issue 1
1.
Appropriation of Mobile Cultural Resources for Learning (pages 1-21)
Norbert Pachler (Institute of Education, UK), John Cook (London Metropolitan University, UK) and Ben Bachmair (University of Kassel, Germany)
2.
Unlocking Lifelong Learning Through E-Heritage: Using Mobile Technologies in Genoa (pages 22-39)
Krassimira Paskaleva (University of Manchester, UK) and Maurizio Megliola (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Germany)
3.
JAMIOLAS 3.0: Supporting Japanese Mimicry and Onomatopoeia Learning Using Sensor Data (pages 40-54)
Bin Hou (University of Tokushima, Japan), Hiroaki Ogata (University of Tokushima, Japan), Masayuki Miyata (University of Tokushima, Japan), Mengmeng Li (University of Tokushima, Japan) and Yuqin Liu (University of Tokushima, Japan)
4.
A Platform for Actively Supporting e-Learning in Mobile Networks (pages 55-79)
Basit A. Khan (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway) and Mihhail Matskin (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)
Issue 2
1.
Mathematics Learning Community Flourishes in the Cellular Phone Environment (pages 1-17)
Wajeeh Daher (An-Najah University, Palestine and Al-Qasemi Academic College of Education, Israel)
2.
The Significance of the Reflective Practitioner in Blended Learning (pages 18-29)
Aleksej Heinze (University of Salford, UK) and Chris Procter (University of Salford, UK)
3.
Cross-Institutional Blended Learning in Teacher Education: A Case Study (pages 30-49)
Carolin Fuchs (Teachers College, Columbia University, USA)
4.
Issue 3
1.
Mobile Phones as Mediating Tools within Augmented Contexts for Development (pages 1-12)
John Cook (London Metropolitan University, UK)
2.
Mobile, Inquiry-Based Learning and Geological Observation: An Exploratory Study (pages 13-29)
Brenda Bannan (George Mason University, USA), Erin Peters (George Mason University, USA) and Patricia Martinez (Arlington Public Schools, USA)
3.
Mobile Learning, Digital Literacies, Information Habitus and At-Risk Social Groups (pages 30-41)
Margit Böck (University of Salzburg, Austria)
Issue 4
1.
Towards Work-Based Mobile Learning: What We Can Learn from the Fields of Work-Based Learning and Mobile Learning (pages 1-18)
Christoph Pimmer (University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Switzerland), Norbert Pachler (Institute of Education University of London) and Graham Attwell (University of Warwick, UK)
3.
Opportunistic (L)earning in the Mobile Knowledge Society (pages 29-46)
Ambjörn Naeve (Royal Institute of Technology, Uppsala University and Stockholm University, Sweden)
5.
Sustaining Mobile Learning and its Institutions (pages 58-65)
John Traxler (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
Volume 1 (2009)
Issue 1
1.
Learning in a Mobile Age (pages 1-12)
John Traxler (Learning Lab, University of Wolverhampton, UK)
2.
Innovation in Mobile Learning: A European Perspective (pages 13-35)
Agnes Kukulska-Hulme (The Open University, UK), Mike Sharples (University of Nottingham, UK), Marcelo Milrad (Vaxjo University, Sweden), Inmaculada Arnedillo-Sanchez (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland) and Giasemi Vavoula (University of Leicester, UK)
3.
A Model of Collaborative Learning Scripts Instantiated with Mobile Technologies (pages 36-48)
Pierre Dillenbourg (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland) and Zeno Crivelli (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
4.
Choreo: pod (pages 49-60)
Dennie Wilson (University of Wolverhampton, UK), Ben Andrews (University of Wolverhampton, UK) and Crispin Dale (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
5.
Affective Tutoring System for Better Learning (pages 61-77)
Abdolhossein Sarrafzadeh (Massey University, New Zealand), Samuel T.V. Alexander (Massey University, New Zealand) and Jamshid Shanbehzadeh (Tarbiat Moalem University, Iran)
Issue 2
1.
Wildfire Activities: New Patterns of Mobility and Learning (pages 1-18)
Yrjö Engeström (University of Helsinki, Finland)
2.
Designing Participant-Generated Context into Guided Tours (pages 19-38)
Juliet Sprake (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)
3.
Improving Cross-Cultural Awareness and Communication through Mobile Technologies (pages 39-53)
Adele Botha (Meraka Institute, South Africa), Steve Vosloo (Stanford University, USA), John Kuner (Stanford University, USA) and Madelein van den Berg (Meraka Institute, South Africa)
4.
Meeting the Challenges in Evaluating Mobile Learning: A 3-Level Evaluation Framework (pages 54-75)
Giasemi Vavoula (University of Leicester, UK) and Mike Sharples (University of Nottingham, UK)
5.
Ethical Considerations in Implementing Mobile Learning in the Workplace (pages 76-92)
Jocelyn Wishart (University of Bristol, UK)
Issue 3
1.
Exploring the Effects of Web-Enabled Self-Regulated Learning and Online Class Frequency on Students' Computing Skills in Blended Learning Courses (pages 1-16)
Pei-Di Shen (Ming Chuan University, Taiwan) and Chia-Wen Tsai (Ming Chuan University, Taiwan)
2.
A Study in Developing a Mobile Learning System based on Human-Computer Interaction Design Principles (pages 17-40)
Kuo-Wei Su (National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, Taiwan), Cheng-Li Liu (Vanung University, Taiwan) and Meng-Fang Kuo (National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, Taiwan)
3.
An Adaptive and Context-Aware Scenario Model Based on a Web Service Architecture for Pervasive Learning Systems (pages 41-69)
Cuong Pham-Nguyen (TELECOM, France), Serge Garlatti (TELECOM, France), B.-Y.-Simon Lau (Multimedia University, Malaysia), Benjamin Barbry (University of Sciences and Technologies of Lille, France) and Thomas Vantroys (University of Sciences and Technologies of Lille, France)
4.
E-Professional Development and Rural Teachers: Finding the Blend (pages 70-85)
Andrew Kitchenham (University of Northern British Columbia, Canada)
Issue 4
1.
Supporting Awareness in Ubiquitous Learning (pages 1-11)
Hiroaki Ogata (University of Tokushima, Japan)
2.
"Premierløytnant Bielke": A Mobile Game for Teaching and Learning History (pages 12-28)
Jo Dugstad Wake (University of Bergen, Norway) and Rune Baggetun (University of Bergen, Norway)
3.
A Mobile Context-Aware Framework for Managing Learning Schedules: Data Analysis from an Interview Study (pages 29-55)
Jane Yin-Kim Yau (University of Warwick, UK) and Mike Joy (University of Warwick, UK)
4.
Transforming Pedagogy Using Mobile Web 2.0 (pages 56-83)
Thomas Cochrane (Unitec, New Zealand) and Roger Bateman (Unitec, New Zealand)
5.
Engaging Students with Mobile Technologies to Support Their Formal and Informal Learning (pages 84-98)
Melanie Ciussi (CERAM Business School, France), Gill Rosner (CERAM Business School, France) and Marc Augier (CERAM Business School, France)