A Literature Review on Alkali Silica Reactivity of Concrete: Consequences and Challenges

A Literature Review on Alkali Silica Reactivity of Concrete: Consequences and Challenges

Muhammad Junaid Munir (School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia), Syed Minhaj Saleem Kazmi (School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia), Yu-Fei Wu (School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia) and Indubhushan Patnaikuni (School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 20
DOI: 10.4018/IJoSE.2018070104

Abstract

Deterioration of concrete structures with time is well understood. One of the major reasons of deterioration is reaction between cement paste and reactive siliceous aggregates which is known as alkali silica reaction (ASR). This article reviews the studies on ASR in concrete. Although a vast literature is available on mechanisms and preventive measures against ASR, however there are still a lot of deficiencies regarding the test methods to detect the ASR potential in concrete. The aim of this article is to discuss different factors affecting ASR, consequences of ASR and different challenges encountered by researchers in the detection of ASR. The study revealed that alkali content of cement, aggregates grading, mineralogical combinations, testing methods and testing conditions are all the challenges, researchers face during evaluation of ASR potential in concrete.
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Factors Affecting Asr

Reactive Aggregates

Reactive aggregates can be classified into naturally occurring siliceous minerals and artificially produced siliceous materials. Mineralogical composition of aggregates, their origin and texture of source rocks are considered responsible for the rate of reaction (i.e., rapid or slow) (Dolar-Mantuani, 1983; Stark, Morgan, Okamoto, & Diamond, 1993). Table 1 shows the details of reactive minerals based on ASTM C294 (standard descriptive nomenclature for constituents of natural mineral aggregates).

Researchers also investigated the use of waste clay bricks as coarse aggregates (Rashid, Hossain, & Islam, 2009). However, mortar bars incorporating clay brick aggregates showed expansion due to ASR along with presence of alkali silica gel (Bektaş, 2014). Waste glasses (commonly used as aggregates) also showed the presence of amorphous silica and resulted into formation of ASR gel, after dissolving under alkali attack (Rashad, 2014; Topçu, Boğa, & Bilir, 2008). It was found that different colors of glass showed different level of reactivity (Du & Tan, 2014; Topçu et al., 2008).

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