A Study on the Intention to Adopt Third Generation (3G) Wireless Service on a Small Community with Unique Culture: The Use of Hofstede Cultural Dimensions in Predicting the Interaction between Culture and the Technology Acceptance Model on Guam

A Study on the Intention to Adopt Third Generation (3G) Wireless Service on a Small Community with Unique Culture: The Use of Hofstede Cultural Dimensions in Predicting the Interaction between Culture and the Technology Acceptance Model on Guam

Kevin K.W. Ho (School of Business and Public Administration, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam)
DOI: 10.4018/jssoe.2012100104
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Most of the prior studies conducted in mobile commerce and wireless service adoption are using the technology acceptance model as their theoretical foundation and are conducted in metropolis. To gain a better understanding on whether the findings of these adoption studies can be generalized in other regions, and in particular, those communities with a small population and have a unique cultural background, the author revisits the third generation (3G) wireless adoption service issue using data collected from Guam. The result shows that the people on Guam have a different 3G wireless service adoption behavior compared with the people from Hong Kong. It is noted that perceived enjoyment plays a mediator role between the impacts of perceived service availability and social influence on the adoption intention. This result helps researchers and practitioners to gain insight for conducting adoption study for communities with a different cultural background, where their information and communication technology infrastructures are rapidly developing.
Article Preview

Introduction

One major challenge, which many information systems (IS) researchers and practitioners are facing in their career, is how to apply their research findings reported in practice. To make things complicated, many external factors, such as culture (Vance et al., 2008), and the stage of technology infrastructure development (Xu et al., 2004), etc., have impacts on the applicability of the research findings collected from metropolis to rural communities. Therefore, there is a need for conducting research to gain a better understanding on how to fine tune the research findings to those less developed areas (Molla & Licker, 2005). To address this issue, we conduct a case study on Guam, an unincorporated territory of the US in the Western Pacific, to show the importance for re-conducting local study of well-known IS phenomenon to gain further insight for incorporating the existing research findings to a community with a totally different cultural background, and information and communication technologies infrastructure.

In IS research, the technology acceptance model, TAM (Davis, 1989; Davis et al., 1992; Venkatesh et al., 2000; Venkatesh et al., 2003) is a well-established theory. The TAM suggests that perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived ease of use (PEOU) of a technology are the key factors affecting behavioral intention (BI) on the adoption of a technology. There are many IS research conducted in the past 20 years using the TAM for investigating the adoption of different types of information technology artifacts, including E-commerce systems (Gefen et al., 2003), E-government systems (Ho & Ho, 2006), E-mail system (Gefen & Straub, 1997), enterprise systems (Amoako-Gyampah & Salam, 2004), health information systems (Huser et al., 2010), Internet banking (Tan & Teo, 2000), software application (Szajna, 1994), and wireless technology (Fang et al., 2006; Hong & Tam, 2006; Wu & Wang, 2006), etc. Most of these studies are conducted in metropolis. Even though these results are proved to be applicable to other major cities, scant studies have been conducted to test whether they are applicable in a community with a small population and a distinctive cultural background. As there are around 23% of countries and independent territories in this World having a population fewer than 200,000 and have a distinctive culture (List of countries by population, n.d.), there is a need for researchers to gain a better understanding on whether the findings of these IS models are applicable in this type of small communities. Therefore, we address this issue in this paper by conducting a case study and investigating whether the findings from major cities are applicable to small communities using the adoption of third generation (3G) wireless services as the platform for the investigation. We choose the adoption of 3G wireless services as the platform because 3G wireless technology is a commonly used technology in our daily life and many prior studies (Fang et al., 2006; Hong & Tam, 2006) have been conducted for this topic using data collected from metropolis.

This paper is presented as follow. We will begin with a review of literature related to the TAM and the Hofstede Cultural Dimensions, which is the method that we will use measure cultural differences in this work. Then we will develop our model and hypotheses. Afterwards, we will present our methodology and data analysis. Then, we will conclude our paper by discussing the theoretical contributions and practical implications of this work, its limitations, and future research direction of this area of research.

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2017): 3 Released, 1 Forthcoming
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2011)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2010)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing