A Technology Acceptance Case of Indonesian Senior School Teachers: Effect of Facilitating Learning Environment and Learning Through Experimentation

A Technology Acceptance Case of Indonesian Senior School Teachers: Effect of Facilitating Learning Environment and Learning Through Experimentation

Juhriyansyah Dalle (Universitas Lambung Mangkurat), Mahesh S. Raisinghani (Texas Woman's University, USA), Aminuddin Prahatama Putra (Universitas Lambung Mangkurat), Ahmad Suriansyah (Universitas Lambung Mangkurat), Sutarto Hadi (Universitas Lambung Mangkurat) and Betya Sahara (Universitas Lambung Mangkurat)
Copyright: © 2021 |Pages: 16
DOI: 10.4018/IJOPCD.2021100104
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Abstract

Based on the immense importance of technology acceptance among the teachers and its vital role in education, the current study aims to bridge the theoretical gap by investigating the association between the school teachers' perception of facilitation learning environment and learning through experimentation among senior school teachers in Indonesia. Data was collected from the senior school teachers of Indonesia using a cross-sectional field survey. The final dataset of 163 respondents was then analyzed using SmartPls3 to test the measurement and structural models. Results revealed that the external variables like facilitation learning environment and learning through experimentation were positively associated with the perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and actual use of the educational technology among the senior school teachers. This study provided insights that the technology supportive learning through experimentation gives a feeling of comfort and ease to teachers, further leading towards the actual usage of modern technology in classroom settings.
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Introduction

Technology is an integral part of bringing change in any organization and also at the societal level. Introducing a technological change in an organization and then maintaining it effectively has always been a great challenge for the decision-makers, especially change practitioners. In today's world, usage and integration of new technology has enormous prominence. In the current educational system, creating knowledge through new technology is vital for both teachers and students (Nedal & Alcoriza, 2018; Vincent-Lancrin et al., 2019). Thus, schools, especially teachers, need to use the technology in their teaching practices for constructive learning and better transformation of the knowledge (Admiraal et al., 2017).

Teachers' motivation to use technology in their classrooms is vital in creating a learning environment (Shute & Rahimi, 2017). Although the research on use of technology by teachers is of Although the research on use of technology by teachers is of immense importance Although the research on use of technology by teachers is of immense importance Although the research on use of technology by teachers is of immense importance Although the research on use of technology by teachers is of immense importance in E-Learning and education research literature, it still lacks in determining factors that influence the actual usage of technology in classroom settings. Past research has resulted in various contextual (e.g., culture) and individual characteristics (e.g. personality traits) in determining the human behavioral process and response to technology. There are several factors that may have an impact on a teachers' technology integration (Baturay, Gökçearslan, & Ke, 2017). Earlier studies have identified various factors playing a role in the process of embracing technology by teachers using the Technology Acceptance Model (Davis, 1989).

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) model has been used by many researchers to explain the technology acceptance process ranging from external factors to actual technology adoption (Li et al., 2019). This model consists of distinct variables that explain the whole process of technology acceptance, including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude towards use, intention to use, and actual usage. This model has been useful due to its utilization by many researchers in a different context (Ursavaş, Yalçın, & Bakır, 2019), especially in understanding teachers' acquisition of technology. The integration of technology in the educational system is very much needed to enhance the effectiveness of teaching and learning (Siefert et al., 2019); however various challenges are also associated with this phenomenon (Cloete, 2017).

Past studies in the educational field determined various tools and factors helping or obstructing the teaching and learning process such as eLearning, technology integration, computer-assisted education, etc. (Baturay et al., 2017; El Alfy, Gómez, & Ivanov, 2017; Talmo & Stoica, 2017; Wasike, 2017). But still, there is a shortage of research in the educational area that are the vital factors that help teachers in the actual adoption of technology. Likewise, a recent study Perienen (2020) recommended future researchers to examine the factors that may influence technology acceptance, such as facilitation learning climate and experimental learning through technology. None of the previous studies has explored these two specific external factors vital for schools, school teachers, and their link with technology acceptance. Therefore, this study aims to fill the gap by determining and responding to future research recommendations by examining the two vital factors that may highly impact the teachers in the integration of technology in their classrooms. The research aims to help educational practitioners understand the whole technology acceptance process by extending the TAM model. This extension is intended to bridge the gap between these two external factors, their use in education research and their significance in e-learning and technology acceptance literature.

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