Agile Project Management in University-Industry Collaboration Projects

Agile Project Management in University-Industry Collaboration Projects

Marika Eve Katariina Säisä (ICT Unit, Faculty of Engineering and Business, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland), Katariina Tiura (ICT Unit, Faculty of Engineering and Business, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland) and Rita Matikainen (ICT Unit, Faculty of Engineering and Business, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland)
DOI: 10.4018/IJITPM.2019040102

Abstract

Both disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge is needed in order for a student to succeed as a professional after graduation. Interdisciplinary knowledge, such as project management skills are important in working life regardless the competence area. In order for a student to gain competences relevant for working life, both traditional and agile project management frameworks should be a part of their studies – in theory and in practice. In this article, a case study is presented on the integration of an agile project management framework into university-industry collaboration projects. First, the methodologies used in theFIRMA are introduced. Thereafter, the activities and the roles of theFIRMA are described and an externally funded R&D project is presented. Finally, the experiences of past and current activities are discussed, and future development thoughts are presented.
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Agile Project Management

Project management knowledge areas consist of: 1. Integration management; 2. Scope management; 3. Time management; 4. Cost management; 5. Quality management; 6. Human Resources management; 7. Communications management; 8. Risk management; and 9. Procurement management. All of the project management knowledge areas consist of variety of different phases such as planning, monitoring, and ending the project. (Richman, 2006, pp. 13-15). Even though the approach and the methods of the traditional and agile project management frameworks are different, the same kind of project management knowledge is needed in order to succeed in projects. According to the FLUX report (2014, p. 5), leadership and management skills are the two most important qualities that HR decision-makers think need to be developed in employees to drive growth over the next five years. Next most important skills are as follow: interpersonal, innovation/creativity, resilience, technical, sales and client management skills.

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