An Autonomic SLA Monitoring Framework Managed by Trusted Third Party in the Cloud Computing

An Autonomic SLA Monitoring Framework Managed by Trusted Third Party in the Cloud Computing

Adil Maarouf (Computer, Networks, Mobility and Modeling Laboratory, FST, Hassan 1st University, Settat, Morocco), Youssef Mifrah (Institut National des Postes et Télécommunications Rabat, Rabat, Morocco), Abderrahim Marzouk (Computer, Networks, Mobility and Modeling Laboratory, FST, Hassan 1st University, Settat, Morocco) and Abdelkrim Haqiq (Computer, Networks, Mobility and Modeling Laboratory, FST, Hassan 1st University, Settat, Morocco)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 30
DOI: 10.4018/IJCAC.2018040104

Abstract

This article describes how currently, service level agreements (SLAs) assurance forms one of the major challenges for cloud computing (CC) in order to guarantee quality of service (QoS) in real-time and control SLA violations. However, due to the highly dynamic nature of this open environment, it is important to have a binding agreement between all the service parties for ensuring trust while fulfilling the expected QoS. To properly operate and manage such complex situations, an effective and efficient monitoring is crucial. The participation of a trusted third party (TTP) is necessary in order to resolve conflicts between involved parties. This article proposes an autonomic SLA monitoring framework managed by TTP composed of two modules: the first one SLA establishment module, which aims at providing support for automated SLA generation and management. The second one, a service monitoring module to dynamically monitor QoS metrics by detecting SLA violations at runtime to verify compliances for the respective SLAs, and to propose a mechanism for an adaptive remedy rectification, as a contribution at the third maturity level of the autonomic computing paradigm as defined by IBM. The framework is validated with scenarios on response time and availability, the results obtained are promising. They confirm that this framework manages SLAs in an efficient way as it detects all violations to be communicated to concerned parties, and identifies particular penalty clauses that can be used to modify the reputation of a provider over time. The TTP framework equipped with such reputation module can provide real-time assessment for consumers informed decision making to continue using a service or to migrate to another service provider in the case of service degradation. This creates a fair competitiveness between providers and hence improves service performance and the reliability in the cloud.
Article Preview

Introduction

The revolutionary technology of Cloud Computing offers a scalable and flexible paradigm where infrastructure, platform, and software are offered to users in the form of services. The management of such environment is inherently complex due to the large-scale number and heterogeneity of resources and the increasing number and types of services a cloud must deliver over the Internet. Combined with a rapidly increasing number of cloud-based services, this complexity generated a pressing request for effective and efficient monitoring solutions. The provisioning of these computing services by cloud providers are regulated by Service Level Agreements (Maarouf, Marzouk, Haqiq, & El Hamlaoui, 2014), which present an important element that provides some degree of assurance. As of now, the differentiating elements between CC solutions are Quality-of-Service and the SLAs guarantee provided by the service providers. Any SLA mainly describes two things: the different Service Level Objectives (SLO) in terms of values for QoS metrics and the penalties to be applied if the objectives have not been accomplished (Maarouf, Marzouk, & Haqiq, 2015). These properties need to be measurable and must be monitored during the provision of the service that has been agreed upon in the SLA (Maarouf, El Hamlaoui, Marzouk, & Haqiq, 2015).

Within the CC concept, SLA monitoring is a task of paramount importance for both cloud service provider (CSP) to avoid penalties if the SLA terms are violated and for cloud service consumer (CSC) to be aware of the status and quality of their running services. Moreover, a violation of an SLA may cause a cascading effect on the dependent services. Thus, may be affecting the overall composition and degrading the overall system performance. For that reason, a trusted third-party monitoring services is required for this, as a consumer can never prove by itself that an SLA was (partially) or totally violated. The participation of a TTP is necessary in order to resolve conflicts between prospective signatories, likewise to monitor SLA violations in real-time in the goal to ensure online monitoring cloud services and provide better than best-effort behavior for clouds. We argue that establishing and monitoring SLA violations in real-time has become a critical issue for CC. Indeed, it is mandatory to monitor the SLA terms to determine whether they are achieved or violated. SLA monitoring is essential for both CSP to avoid penalties if the SLA terms are violated and for CSC to be aware of the status and quality of their running services. Moreover, a violation of an SLA may cause a cascading effect on the dependent services. Thus, may be affecting the overall composition and degrading the overall system performance. Furthermore, a client can never prove by itself that an SLA was violated.

This raises the following questions: (i) How to describe the SLA terms between CSP and CSC, such as service levels, penalties in case of SLA violation, etc. (ii) How to provide guarantees on cloud QoS monitoring and detection of SLA violation? How to create a fair competitiveness between providers and hence improve service performance and the reliability in the cloud?

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 9: 4 Issues (2019): Forthcoming, Available for Pre-Order
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2018)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2011)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing