An Enactivist Approach to Web-based Learning: Live Campus as a Proposal for a Learning Environment

An Enactivist Approach to Web-based Learning: Live Campus as a Proposal for a Learning Environment

Giuseppe De Simone (University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy), Diana Carmela Di Gennaro (Department of Human, Philosophical and Educational Sciences, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy) and Riccardo Fragnito (Pegaso Telematics University, Naples, Italy)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/IJDLDC.2015040104
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Abstract

In the Web-based learning era, the possibility to use the online network for learning activities, studies and research has brought about a revolution in the educational processes and the emergence of a new culture characterized by the idea that knowledge is not closed and defined, but open and accessible to all. Within a perspective in which knowledge is generated by the interaction of the individual with the environment, the socio-constructivist approach paved the way to new theoretical frameworks that, starting from the social dimension of learning, acknowledge and embrace the biological aspects of learning processes, thus offering interesting reflections on the web-learning phenomenon. Stemming from these assumptions, LiveCampus was created; a social learning environment aimed at fostering a synergistic integration between the dimensions of formal and informal knowledge.
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Web-Based Learning: From The Socio-Constructivist To The Enactivist Approach

In the web-based learning era, the possibility to use the network for learning activities, studies and research enabled the learner to be the protagonist of his/her own cultural growth in the so-called Web 2.0, which is now considered a social context in which everyone can express themselves through different languages and can access information and communicate across time and space boundaries. This has brought about a revolution in the educational processes and the emergence of a new culture characterized by the idea that knowledge is not closed and defined, but open and accessible to all, within the perspective of a shared and participated knowledge (Falcinelli, 2012).

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