Applying Genre-based and L2 Pragmatic Instruction to Teaching Oral Presentations on the Web

Applying Genre-based and L2 Pragmatic Instruction to Teaching Oral Presentations on the Web

Hung-Tzu Huang (Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan) and Yu-Jung Chang (Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan)
DOI: 10.4018/IJCALLT.2015100105
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This article describes the development of an Internet-based instructional platform, which aims to guide EFL college students in learning and practicing oral presentation skills. Genre-based instruction and insights from L2 pragmatic instructional research inspired the platform's design. The instructional units in the online platform engage learners in a comparative analysis of rhetorical and language features at both expert speaker and learner speech levels and scaffold the learners in utilizing these features to deliver practice presentations. Documenting the four EFL students' experiences using the platform, the user reports show how the guided tasks expanded the students' understanding of ‘good presentations.' For learners whose language-learning goals are directed towards participating in a global community, it is suggested that key factors in developing web-based oral presentations materials are corpus selection and pedagogical tasks, which consider the learners' subjectivity in determining rhetorical and pragmatic norms.
Article Preview

Genre And Genre-Based Instruction

In the last two decades, conceptions of genre have expanded from a system of classification used to define literary works to ‘complex oral or written responses by speakers or writers to the demand of a social context’ (Johns, 2002, p. 3). Scholars in ESP and new rhetoric studies generally believe in the power of teaching genre knowledge and discourse regularities explicitly to help language learners grasp the context and purpose of communication (Freedman & Medway, 1994; Flowerdew, 2002; Hyland, 2004; Johns, 2002). By providing learners with rich, authentic sample texts (spoken or written) and guiding them through analyses of textual regularities, communicative functions, and contexts of use, genre-based language instruction aims to provide learners with not only ‘the knowledge and skills they need to communicate successfully in particular discourse communities’, but also to ‘access to socially powerful forms of language’ (Paltridge, 2001, p. 3).

The upsurge of interest in genre analysis (e.g. moves/schematic structure, lexico-grammatical patterns) for ESL/EAP pedagogical purposes has mainly centered on written genres. Research efforts have been dedicated to familiarizing students with both non-academic genres (i.e. emails and letters) (e.g. Sachiko, 2011) and academic genres (i.e. doctoral dissertations, research articles, academic essays, examination/quiz responses, summaries, and reports) (e.g. Dudley-Evans, 2002; Flowerdew, 2002; Paltridge & Starfield, 2007; Swales, 2004; Swales & Lindemann, 2002).

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2017): 3 Released, 1 Forthcoming
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2011)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing