Appraisal, Coping and High Level Emotions Aspects of Computational Emotional Thinking

Appraisal, Coping and High Level Emotions Aspects of Computational Emotional Thinking

Max Talanov (Higher Institute of Information Technologies and Information Systems, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia) and Alexander Toschev (Higher Institute of Information Technologies and Information Systems, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 16
DOI: 10.4018/IJSE.2015010102
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Turing genius anticipated current research in AI field for 65 years and stated that idea of intelligent machines “cannot be wholly ignored, because the idea of 'intelligence' is itself emotional rather than mathematical” (). This is the second article dedicated to emotional thinking bases. In the first article, the authors () created overall picture and proposed framework for computational emotional thinking. They used 3 bases for their work: AI - six thinking levels model described in book “The emotion machine” (). Evolutionary psychology model: “Wheel of emotions” (). Neuroscience (neurotransmission) theory of emotions by Lovheim “Cube of emotions” (). Based on neurotransmitters impact the authors proposed to model emotional computing systems. Current work is dedicated to three aspects left not described in first article: appraisal: algorithm and predicates - how inbound stimulus is estimated to trigger proper emotional response, coping: the way human treat with emotional state triggered by stimulus appraisal and further thinking processes, high level emotions impact on system and its computational processes.
Article Preview

Introduction

There are three bases of computational emotions thinking theory presented in our previous (Talanov & Toschev, 2014) and current article: neuroscience: (Arbib & Fellous, 2004; Berridge & Robinson, 2003; Fellous, 1999; Lovheim, 2012; Plutchik, 2001), computer science: (Breazeal, 2002; Cambria & Hussain, 2012; Cambria, Livingstone, & Hussain, 2012; Kort, Reilly & Picard, 2001; Picard, 1995; Marsella, Gratch, & Petta, 2010; Lin, Spraragen, & Zyda, 2012; Gratch & Marsella, 2005; Larue, Poirier, & Nkambou, 2012) and evolutional psychology: (Plutchik, 2001; Kelly, 2009; Tomkins, 1962, 1963, 1991, 1981).

Overall emotional process was described exhaustively in our previous article (Talanov & Toschev, 2014) and looks like following:

  • 1.

    Inbound stimulus is appraised non-consciously (affective appraisal)

  • 2.

    Neuromodulation is triggered and it actually switches the emotional state of the system. System feels emotion

  • 3.

    Conscious processes are triggered: stimulus cognition with stimulus deliberation, stimulus reflective thinking, stimulus cognition reflection, stimulus cognition self-reflection, stimulus cognition self-conscious reflection (cognitive appraisal)

  • 4.

    Parallel to conscious processes the instinctive behaviour could be triggered, it influencing the environment

  • 5.

    Conscious processes described above triggers conscious behaviour and in its turn it influences the environment again

The neuromodulators influence in emotional processes was described in Lovheim article (Lovheim, 2012). We used Plutchik ”wheel of emotions” (Plutchik, 2001) as base psychological model of emotions and adopted his emotional feedback loop processes to fit cognitive architecture ”model of six” of Marvin Minsky (Minsky, 2007). We developed mapping of neuromodulators impact on computational processes (Talanov & Toschev, 2014)

  • 1.

    Generic:

    • a.

      Computing power load: dopamine, serotonin

    • b.

      Computing power distribution: nonadrenaline

    • c.

      Memory distribution (attention): noradrenaline

    • d.

      Learning: serotonin, dopamine

    • e.

      Storage: serotonin, dopamine

  • 2.

    Decision making/reward processing:

    • a.

      Confidence: serotonin

    • b.

      Satisfaction: serotonin

    • c.

      Motivation, wanting: dopamine

    • d.

      Risky choices inclination: noradrenaline

    • e.

      Number of options to process: noradrenaline

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 8: 2 Issues (2017)
Volume 7: 2 Issues (2016)
Volume 6: 2 Issues (2015)
Volume 5: 2 Issues (2014)
Volume 4: 2 Issues (2013)
Volume 3: 2 Issues (2012)
Volume 2: 2 Issues (2011)
Volume 1: 2 Issues (2010)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing