Assessing Individual Health Insurance Coverage and Utilization Before and After the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Assessing Individual Health Insurance Coverage and Utilization Before and After the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Theresa Jefferson (Sellinger School of Business and Management, Loyola University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA), Gloria Phillips-Wren (Sellinger School of Business and Management, Loyola University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA) and Phoebe D. Sharkey (Sellinger School of Business and Management, Loyola University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA)
Copyright: © 2016 |Pages: 16
DOI: 10.4018/IJSDS.2016100105
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

The adoption of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) in 2010 with the intent to improve the U.S. health care delivery system by expanding health insurance coverage and controlling health care costs has generated intense debate regarding its implementation. Marketplaces known as insurance exchanges have been established to provide coverage for Americans who otherwise could not get affordable health care benefits. These exchanges have been plagued with financial losses and other challenges leading to several large insurance providers discontinuing participation in the program. There are many possible remedies under consideration to make the program work better. This research seeks to support program evaluation as well as potential modifications to the law by providing baseline data to compare access and costs in states with state-based exchanges compared to states with federal exchanges. The authors perform an analysis by state for the years 2012 and 2013 (pre-PPACA implementation) using data from the Current Population Survey (U.S. Census) as well as de-identified claims data from Inovalon, Inc.
Article Preview

Background

The PPACA became a law on March 23, 2010, when it was signed by President Barrack Obama. The primary objective of the law, and its subsequent legislation, is to improve the health care delivery system by expanding coverage and controlling health care costs. Provisions of the law extend Medicaid to all individuals and families earning less than 133% of the poverty level and make available income-related subsidies to uninsured Americans without access to employer-based insurance in order to purchase coverage in newly created exchanges.

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2011)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2010)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing