Big Five Personality in Online Learning and Games: Analysis of Student Activity

Big Five Personality in Online Learning and Games: Analysis of Student Activity

Peter Krátky (Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (STU), Bratislava, Slovakia), Jozef Tvarožek (Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (STU), Bratislava, Slovakia) and Daniela Chudá (Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (STU), Bratislava, Slovakia)
DOI: 10.4018/IJHCITP.2016070103
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Abstract

Online learning gives promise of effective learning for masses. Personalized learning experiences tailored for individual needs and preferences of each student are key ingredients in making online learning successful. Current approaches to adaptive and personalized online learning use student's personality profile and preferred learning style to adapt learning content and activities in order to provide the best possible experience to each individual student. Research has shown that effects on different types of learning activities in various settings may be different. This study analyses how personality affects student's performance in an online learning environment for programming exercises and how the student's personality can be estimated unobtrusively using a casual online game. The data used to evaluate were collected from an online learning environment used in university programming courses over the course of several years. The activity indicators show significant correlations with overall academic results of students and particularly with personality traits.
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Research in behavioral psychology is interested in how to measure person’s personality. One of the most popular models used by psychologists is Big Five personality taxonomy describing five personality traits – openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, neuroticism (McCrae & John, 1992). Description of the particular dimensions of the model is in Table 1. Self-report questionnaires are used to measure the personality characteristics. The most popular one is NEO-FFI consisting of 60 items, 12 per each trait, rated on 5-point scale. It is a relatively quick way to measure person’s personality profile, takes approximately 10 minutes to fill out, and has been shown to have good internal and external validity (Costa & McCrae, 1992). The NEO-FFI self-report questionnaire is often used in academic research when studying the influence of personality.

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