BIM: A Transformative Technology within the Architectural Curriculum in Schools of Architecture (Pedagogic Stages of Architectural Education and the Transformative Effect of BIM)

BIM: A Transformative Technology within the Architectural Curriculum in Schools of Architecture (Pedagogic Stages of Architectural Education and the Transformative Effect of BIM)

David E. Morton (School of the Built Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, UK)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 19
DOI: 10.4018/ij3dim.2012100106
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Abstract

Building Information Modeling (BIM) has made a considerable impact on the construction industry and the way in which building design information can be accessed and interrogated. This impact is now being seen in the Schools of Architecture in the UK. Academia is beginning to see the feasibility and benefits of converting to such a new technology; will this inevitably start to filter into teaching BIM to architecture students? The concern by many in academia is that design will become secondary to pedagogy of building design. This viewpoint is based on the impact of CAD, where the art of hand drawing was feared lost forever. The use of computers in schools of architecture has become the norm, and the creative moving of a pen across paper has been replaced, to a degree, by the cursor across the CAD screen. As academia moved to respond to this change, the need to teach CAD became increasingly important. Therefore, will the paradigm shift of BIM require the inevitable move to a new approach in the design and construction of buildings? There are many misconceptions of BIM and the dilemma is that those teaching within the schools need to understand how BIM can readily interface with the design process and allow interrogation of the design are far earlier stages of the concept. Will academia ensure that BIM is used to enhance the creative process not hinder it?
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Bim Towards An Integrated Approach

Previous papers have indicated that there is mixed opinion on the timing for implementing BIM into the design curriculum in schools. The underlying connection between these two diverse conclusions is that there is a need to ensure our cohorts are fully conversant with technology and become ‘technology ready’ at the point of graduation. This readiness is now firmly focused around an integrated design approach.

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