Computer Based Psychological Interventions: Subject to the Efficacy of Psychological Services

Computer Based Psychological Interventions: Subject to the Efficacy of Psychological Services

Jyoti Mishra Pandey (Psychiatry Department, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India), Shobit Garg (SMI Medical College and Hospital, Dehradun, India), Preeti Mishra (SMI Medical College and Hospital, Dehradun, India) and Bholeshwar Prashad Mishra (Dayanand Medical College and Hospital (DMC&H), Ludhiana, India)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 9
DOI: 10.4018/IJCCP.2017010102
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Abstract

The digital world and technology have remained a very fascinating precinct in human life. This paper contains empirical evidence on the acceptance and efficacy of computer and internet-based interventions for mental disorders has increased. Despite growing evidence of effectiveness of digital interventions, it is still unclear how the practice of interventions should be measured, how this is associated with benefits, and how much interventions should be used in order to get health benefits. Guided computer-based interventions combined with face to face therapeutic sessions give a very prolific result in a long run. More empirical and research-based support is required to compare the benefits and drawbacks between computer-based and face-to-face assessment and therapeutic interventions. This article focuses on the various aspects of computer-based intervention and how these upcoming digital interventions are subject to the efficacy of traditional face-to-face therapeutic approaches.
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Introduction

Digital world and technology have remained a very fascinating precinct in human’s life. From decades digital health interventions hold a promise of providing help and support more constantly and cost-effectively than traditional face-to-face therapies. Web-based computer-tailored interventions are increasingly being tested to target health-related behaviors, such as physical activity, dietary intake, and smoking (Brug, Oenema, & Campbell, 2003). Similarly, empirical evidence on the acceptance and efficacy of computer and internet based interventions for mental disorders has been increased. Several reviews and meta-analyses have shown that these interventions hold great promise in the treatment of adults with depression (Foroushani, Schneider & Assareh, 2011; Richards & Richardson, 2012; Kaltenthaler et al., 2008), depression and anxiety (Andrews, Cuijpers, Craske, McEvoy & Titov, 2010; Van't-Hof, Cuijpers & Stein, 2009), anxiety (Cuijpers et al., 2009; Reger & Gahm, 2009), obsessive-compulsive disorder (Herbst et al., 2012; Tumur, Kaltenthaler, Ferriter, Beverley & Parry, 2007), and traumatic stress (Amstadter et al., 2009; Benight, Ruzek & Waldrep, 2008). Despite growing evidence of effectiveness of digital interventions, it is still unclear how the practice of interventions should be measured, how this is associated with benefits, and how much interventions should be used in order to get health benefits. Several studies have found that active usage mediates the effects of interventions, in both face-to-face and digital interventions (Patrick et al., 2011; Webber, et al., 2008; Lewis et al., 2008; Powell et al., 2013; Cavanagh et al., 2013). Active digital intervention usage has been associated with outcomes in several areas of well-being and health, including weight loss (Patrick et al., 2011), physical activity (Lewis et al., 2008), mental well-being (Powell et al., 2013), and depression and anxiety (Cavanagh et al., 2013). Preliminary evidence also suggests that computer and internet based interventions may be acceptable and effective interventions for adolescents with mental disorders (Richardson, Stallar & Velleman, 2010; Siemer, Fogel & Van Voorhees, 2011).

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