Cybernetics Orchestration Between States and Corporations Without Rule of Law

Cybernetics Orchestration Between States and Corporations Without Rule of Law

Hüseyin Tolu (Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Turkey)
Copyright: © 2020 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/IJT.2020010102
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Abstract

The political sociology of emerging technology is critical for any government, particularly in terms of the potential for assisting in ruling over the citizen body. Noticeably, while authoritarian governments have little to no concern about their ‘right to rule', how is ‘rule of law' in the technoethics of cybernetics defined in democratic regimes? As we are now in the cyber era, this study contends that various democratic practices in cybernetics have in practice transformed into techniques of technocratic totalitarianism throughout partnerships between governments and corporations under the guise of democratism. Hence, this study hypothesises that the technoethics of cybernetics, the divisions between legitimacy versus illegitimacy, and judicial versus unjudicial matters have turned out to be indistinct in theory, which noticeably signifies many constitutional violations.
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Introduction

The political sociology of emerging technology is critical for any government, particularly in terms of the potential for assisting in ruling over the citizen body. Noticeably, while authoritarian governments have little to no concern about their ‘right to rule’, how is ‘rule of law’ in cybernetics approached in democratic regimes? In the matter of cybernetics which is the ‘scientific study of control and communication’ in any structure via technology (Wiener, 1964), global corporations are now in cooperation with governmental bodies, so there are an extended range of actors for which concerns about human rights (protections versus violations) have become critical issues. Therefore, the most serious struggle regarding decision-makers (e.g. Lord Chancellors, Members of Constitutional Court or Members of Parliaments) has been faced by the equilibrium between courts and governments. The most commonly declared pretexts for political influence on the judiciary is the struggle against international terrorism and national security but studies have concluded that the real desire is to increase political power by regulating the internet, and its related technology, to be in the dominant place within global political economy (Cohen-Almagor, 2011). Hence, this study focuses on cybernetics of technoethics “deals with human processes and practices connected to technology which are becoming embedded within social, political, and moral spheres of life. It also examines social policies and interventions occurring in response to issues generated by technology advancement and use” (Luppicini, 2008, p.4).

This paper argues how concerns about technoethics of cybernetics can be approached theoretically based on democratism which is a fundamental principle of, or offers confidence in social equality or the right to ordinary people to participate appropriately in decision making processes. “A computer will do what you tell it to do, but that may be much different from what you had in mind” Joseph Weizenbaum (1923-2008). So, it is critical to analyse how the current or future cybernetics systems in democratic regimes would be shaped within techno-political sociology and whether they adhere to democratic principles or not. This study postulates that the distinctions between legitimacy versus illegitimacy and judicial versus injudicial have become blurred in theory, as seen in the culture of routine governmental surveillance, and poses theoretically questions whether or not such practices would represent violations of the constitution or the current and future casus belli in a struggle between governments and citizens?

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