Development of a Measurement Instrument for Website Design Utilizing Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Multi-Attribute Decision Modeling

Development of a Measurement Instrument for Website Design Utilizing Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Multi-Attribute Decision Modeling

Ron Cheek (Moody College of Business, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA, USA), Martha L. Sale (Accounting and Finance, Texas A&M University – Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, USA) and Colleen Schwarz (Moody College of Business, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA, USA)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 13
DOI: 10.4018/ijebr.2015070102
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Abstract

For many organizations their websites are the first impression customers have of their companies. The impact and importance of web design on organizations continues to dramatically increase. Yet many organizations continue to struggle to find tools to strategically analyze their websites and overall online presence. While there have been numerous studies offering “best practices” for website design, most of these are dated and do not take into consideration new applications and social media tools that come into the market. In our research over 900 surveys were conducted on Inc. Magazine's Top 500 list (2011-13) of fastest growing companies in the United States. The analysis of these surveys resulted in a list of shared elements (best practices) common to the websites surveyed. Through the use of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Multi-attribute Decision Model, we developed a measure by which companies can assess their web presence in comparison to this best practices model. This model provides an internally consistent, robust model against which to measure an organization's website.
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Literature Review

We conducted a literature review based on peer-reviewed journal articles for website design and found the topic to be highly dynamic. New applications and social media tools having high impact on internet traffic and websites are being continually created. These social media tools demand continuous change and adaptations by organizational websites. Top-level peer-reviewed journals may take anywhere from 2-3 years for an article to be published. By that time, the standards for websites have gone through several iterations.

For example Pinterest, an application that offers visual discovery, collection, sharing, and storage tools was started in 2010. It already has over 300 million active users. Hootsuite was founded in 2008, but only after a $200 million investment in 2012 did it actually gain wide acceptance. It is a tool used by most websites to do manage their brands. These are only two examples of recent “must have” social media tools for organizational websites.

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