E-Pedagogical Support Strategies to Teaching Methodology of Economics Students at an Open Distance Learning University

E-Pedagogical Support Strategies to Teaching Methodology of Economics Students at an Open Distance Learning University

Micheal M. van Wyk (University of South Africa, South Africa)
Copyright: © 2020 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/IJOPCD.2020070101
OnDemand PDF Download:
Available
$29.50
No Current Special Offers
TOTAL SAVINGS: $29.50

Abstract

A systematic review of the literature of e-pedagogical support strategies for an open distance learning context was done to explore the knowledge “gap” on existing scholarly works. This paper investigates the use of pedagogical support strategies employed to support student learning in an online Teaching Methodology of Economics course. The research followed a pragmatic approach—an explanatory mixed-methods design—to conduct the research. An online questionnaire and eDiscussion forum entries were employed to collect data. Convenient and purposive sampling of postgraduate students (n=179) in Teaching Methodology of Economics were selected. Students voluntarily completed the online survey. Findings and practical implications were formulated to advance online pedagogical strategies to support student learning and thus promote essential competencies for the course in the college of education at an open distance learning university. The current study has only examined a small sampling of student views regarding pedagogical strategies employed in a teacher education online course. More research is needed to establish whether a larger sample, comparing similar courses in the teacher education programme, will yield different results.
Article Preview
Top

Introduction

Universities are engaged in a process of transforming existing curricula compelling by a new “decolonised-Africanised” curriculum drive aimed to make institutions sustainable and providing quality education to students. The debates foster critical thinking towards transforming future learning programmes that are appropriate and favour students' needs in particular student support (Bates, 2010). Another issue emerged from student demands ranging from academic and financial support to wellness support. According to Tait (2000), research has shown how specific and carefully considered technological interventions can provide answers to these teaching and learning concerns among students and lecturers. Moreover, Wangenge-Ouma (2012) concurs with Tait (2000) that planning support for students is crucial, but no guarantee is given that a common design for student support services exists. Thirdly, lecturers have a responsibility to guide, support and encourage students to complete the course – regardless of their circumstances and challenges (Simpson, 2012). Finally, lecturers can increase positive moments to motivate and advise students to become determined to successfully complete the course. Scholars are of the view that motivation and support systems play an important role in the success of distance learners at open and distance learning universities (Tait, 2000; Simpson, 2008; Wangenge-Ouma, 2012; van Wyk, 2018). After conducting a scoping view of scholarly works on student support, the majority of research conducted on student support emerged in the areas of the traditional face-to-face (F2F contact), blended learning environments (hybrid)l but to a lesser extent an open distance learning (ODL) context (Simpson, 2004; Tomas, Lasen, Field, & Skamp, 2015; Zawacki-Richter, Alturki, & Aldraiweesh, 2017). The majority of research publications on student support emerged in the areas of traditional face-to-face (F2F) contact (Graf, Kinshuk, & Liu, 2009), blended distance learning environments (Troiano, Liefeld, & Trachtenberg, 2010; Rodriguez, Bass, Souza, Lynch, Lystad, & White, 2019) – and, to a lesser extent, the ODL context (Simpson, 2004; Tomas, Lasen, Field, & Skamp, 2015). Research indicated that lecturers have the responsibility to guide, support and encourage students to complete their course, no matter the latter’s circumstances and challenges (Tait, 2000; Troiano, Liefeld, & Trachtenberg, 2010). Moreover, scholars are of the view that motivation and effective support systems play an important role in the success of distance learners at ODL universities (Beldarrain, 2006; Simpson, 2008; van Wyk, 2019). One aspect that a lecturer could apply, for instance, is to write motivational or encouraging texts on a student WhatsApp group or blogging space (Simpson, 2012; Manca and Ranieri, 2016). Anderson (2019) extends these views on the adoption of social media as teaching support tools has change how lecturers daily created engaged online environments. Finally, lecturers can increase the number of positive moments they use to motivate and advise their students, so that the latter become determined to complete the course (Simpson, 2012; Watson, Bishop, & Ferdinand-James, 2017). This motivated the author as matter of urgency and concern, to venture into what support is provided to students, and how in this case the researcher can use one of my modules, Teaching Methodology Economics to explore it. As an academic, the researcher needs to reflect from time to time on the quality of teaching and learning, student support, and relevance of the module in empowering student teachers with the necessary competence for the teaching profession. This paper investigates the use of pedagogical support strategies employed to support students’ learning in an online Teaching Methodology Economics course. To achieve this purpose, the following questions are formulated:

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Volume 13: 1 Issue (2023)
Volume 12: 4 Issues (2022)
Volume 11: 4 Issues (2021)
Volume 10: 4 Issues (2020)
Volume 9: 4 Issues (2019)
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2018)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2011)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing