Establishing Lessons for Ireland's BIM Policy Through a Systematic Review of International BIM Programmes

Establishing Lessons for Ireland's BIM Policy Through a Systematic Review of International BIM Programmes

Alan V. Hore (School of Surveying and Construction Management, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland), Barry McAuley (School of Real Estate and Economics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland) and Roger West (Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 15
DOI: 10.4018/IJ3DIM.2017100101

Abstract

BIM usage is accelerating rapidly across the globe, driven by the major private and government owners who want to embrace the benefits of faster, more certain project outcomes. The support of central government for BIM implementation can be regarded as the key driving force leading to higher utilisation of BIM. To further understand how international governments have supported their BIM programmes, the BIM Innovation Capability Programme (BICP) research team in Ireland completed a comprehensive Global BIM Study in 2017. An explicit ingredient of this article involved conducting a comprehensive literature review of global BIM adoption initiatives, with a particular focus on successful enablers in international regions. This helped inform the publication of the Digital Transition Roadmap published by the National BIM Council (NBC) of Ireland in late 2017. This article details the findings of an examination of BIM progress in eight countries of particular interest to the NBC given their relative advancement in their BIM journey. Whilst the results showed a variation of approach, evidence suggests that this was best achieved through the establishment of a central resource funded by government to drive digital transition. This article is particularly timely as Ireland releases its own Digital Construction Transition Roadmap 2018-2021. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how Ireland's Roadmap reflects best international practice and why international knowledge sharing and collaboration will be an ongoing priority for Ireland's transition programme.
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Introduction

BIM usage is accelerating rapidly across the globe, driven by the major private and government owners who want to embrace the benefits of faster, more certain project delivery and more reliable quantity and cost (Hore et al., 2017a; McGraw Hill Construction Report, 2014a; WEF, 2016, 2018). The intended benefits of BIM are now well known which includes the potential to improve coordination, communication, data management, analysis, simulation, construction productivity and facilities management (Puolitaival & Forsyth, 2016).

Learning from leading jurisdictions, governments who are embarking on the transformational journeys have been convinced that the strategic use of BIM can support a leaner, more innovative construction sector, thus addressing declining productivity (Kelly et al., 2013). For governments, BIM is now recognised as an effective process which can improve efficiency and productivity within the industry (Construction, 2020). Post construction, public sector bodies can use the model to automate the creation of inventory lists for equipment, populate current FM systems and reduce redundancy in the maintenance of facility data for FM activities (Brindal & Prasanna, 2014).

The support of central government for BIM implementation can be regarded as the key driving force leading to higher utilisation of BIM (Wong et al., 2009, 2011).

Consultation, expert input and research evidence indicate that strong leadership of government and industry, focusing on standards, education and procurement change, is critical to any successful digital transition programme in construction (NBC, 2017).

The authors chose to build on results of their recent Global BIM 2017 Study (Hore et al., 2017a) and BIM in Ireland 2017 Study (Hore et al, 2017b and 2017c). The Global BIM Study focused primarily on evidence of regulatory BIM, key champions and noteworthy publications in particular jurisdictions. The study led to the authors making connections with persons involved in national BIM programmes in most of the 27 countries investigated. This networking led to the opportunity to deepen the conversation with particular international contacts, learn how their BIM programmes were organised, managed and the levels of governmental support and initiatives that were evident.

Table 1 provides a list of the target organisations consulted.

Table 1.
Organisations consulted
CountriesContact Organisations
AustraliaQSx Tech and Change Agents AEC
CanadabuildingSMART (bSI) Canada
FinlandVTT Technical Research Centre and University of Liverpool
FrancePlan Transition Numérique dans le Bâtiment (PTNB)
GermanyPlanen-bauen 4.0 GmbH
United KingdomBIM Regions UK
ScotlandScottish Futures Trust
South KoreaMyongji University

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