HArnessing Multi-Stakeholders Involvement in Result Based Aquaculture (HASIRA) Extension Service in Tanzania

HArnessing Multi-Stakeholders Involvement in Result Based Aquaculture (HASIRA) Extension Service in Tanzania

Bernard Ronald Tarimo (Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania, United Republic Of) and Camilius A. Sanga (Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania, United Republic Of)
DOI: 10.4018/IJICTHD.2017100104
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Abstract

The wide spread of mobile phones to many actors of aquaculture value chain have brought a new opportunity for enhancing access to aquaculture advisory and extension service in developing countries. Despite the potential shown by mobile phones in provision of other social economic services to both rural and urban communities, there are few studies presented how these tools facilitate access to aquaculture extension service among aquaculture farmers in the country, Tanzania. This article assesses how mobile phones can facilitate the provision of aquaculture extension service among aquaculture farmers in Tanzania. The article establishes an understanding on how aquaculture extension service is provided to aquaculture farmers through mobile phones using UshauriKilimo. UshauriKilimo is an agro-advisory and extension system which is now in use for more than two years. The article contributes to the existing body of knowledge with respect to ICT mediated aquaculture extension.
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1. Introduction

Aquaculture is practiced in most African countries (Sobo, 2006). In Tanzania the agriculture sector (which includes aquaculture) is known for employing more than 70% of the total population; contributing about 25% to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP); bringing about 66% of the foreign exchange; and providing raw materials for local industries (URT, 2008). The sector also feeds the nation and is the source of livelihoods to most rural communities in the country. Despite the great potential of agriculture in Tanzania, the sector is characterised by low productivity; under-utilization of the available land, water and human resources; lack of agricultural support services; weak research-extension-farmer linkages among others (URT, 2008; Akinbile & Alabi, 2011). The situation has to a great extent limited the agricultural transformation strategies which have been implemented over the years. This has equally resulted into high poverty levels among rural and farming communities in the country.

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