INDUSTRY AND PRACTICE: How Clean is your Data?

INDUSTRY AND PRACTICE: How Clean is your Data?

Huw Price (BitbyBit International Ltd., UK)
Copyright: © 1994 |Pages: 7
DOI: 10.4018/jdm.1994010104
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Abstract

Relational databases are the cornerstone of the current IT strategy for the majority of companies, but why is it that very few have a coordinated approach to delivering quality data to their users. Huw Price, Managing Director of BitbyBit examines the theory and practice of using the DBMS to enforce data quality. Before examining the problems of data quality in relational databases it is worth recapping their structure. The concepts behind relational databases are straight forward and one of their attractions is the easy way the data model can be defined and implemented. Relational databases store data in tables. Each table is made up of rows and columns, see the example in Figure 1. When designing relational databases, the philosophy very simply, is to break down the data into their simplest related components, such that no data is repeatedly carried or duplicated in different tables.

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