Instructor Perceptions of Web Technology Feature and Instructional Task Fit

Instructor Perceptions of Web Technology Feature and Instructional Task Fit

Troy J. Strader (College of Business and Public Administration, Drake University, Des Moines, IA, USA), Diana Reed (College of Business and Public Administration, Drake University, Des Moines, IA, USA), Inchul Suh (College of Business and Public Administration, Drake University, Des Moines, IA, USA) and Joyce W. Njoroge (College of Business and Public Administration, Drake University, Des Moines, IA, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/ijwltt.2015070104

Abstract

In this exploratory study, university faculty (instructor) perceptions of the extent to which eight unique features of Web technology are useful for various instructional tasks are identified. Task-technology fit propositions are developed and tested using data collected from a survey of instructors in business, pharmacy, and arts/humanities. It is proposed that the Web technology features can be classified into three groups. Ubiquity and universal standards are primary features that are useful for supporting all of the teaching tasks. Richness, interactivity, information density, and personalization are contextual features which are each useful for specific tasks. Global reach is of secondary importance for supporting traditional classroom instructional tasks. Support is found for each proposition except universal standards and social technology is not perceived to be as important as anticipated. Implications and conclusions are discussed for learning management system designers, instructors, and educational technology researchers.
Article Preview

Learning Management System Task-Technology Fit Studies

Past studies have attempted to identify the relationship between educational technologies and their impact on instructor and student attitudes, usage, and resulting performance. These systems may be referred to as learning management systems (LMSs), virtual learning systems (VLSs), virtual learning environments (VLEs), e-learning systems, or blended learning systems. In the following discussion all of these systems will be referred to as learning management systems.

One theoretical basis for these studies is the task-technology fit (TTF) model (Goodhue and Thompson, 1995). From the fit focus perspective, task characteristics and technology characteristics are shown to impact task-technology fit which is related to user utilization and performance. Several recent studies have investigated TTF in the context of various forms of learning management systems from either the student or instructor perspective. The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed and each study’s methodology and findings.

One study addressed the issue of student and instructor perceptions of task-technology fit for a specific virtual learning environment (VLE) (WebCT) (McGill & Hobbs, 2008). The study was based on a survey of users in an Australian university. They found that fit, satisfaction, and attitude toward use was higher for students than for instructors. Students expected VLE use to have a higher impact on their learning. Instructors were found to have higher perceptions of social norms. Instructors were found to have higher perceptions of social norms where usage may be driven by institutional pressures. Overall, the study found that there was a great deal of uncertainty about the impacts that VLEs have on teaching activities and effectiveness.

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 14: 4 Issues (2019): Forthcoming, Available for Pre-Order
Volume 13: 4 Issues (2018): 2 Released, 2 Forthcoming
Volume 12: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 11: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 10: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 9: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2011)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2010)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2009)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2008)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2007)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2006)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing