Ludic Learning: Exploration of TLE TeachLivE™ and Effective Teacher Training

Ludic Learning: Exploration of TLE TeachLivE™ and Effective Teacher Training

Aleshia T. Hayes (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA), Carrie L. Straub (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA), Lisa A. Dieker (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA), Charlie E. Hughes (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA) and Michael C. Hynes (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/jgcms.2013040102
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Abstract

New and emerging technology in the field of virtual environments has permitted a certain malleability of learning milieus. These emerging environments allow learning and transfer through interactions that have been intentionally designed to be pleasurable experiences. TLE TeachLivE™ is just such an emerging environment that engages teachers in practice on pedagogical and content aspects of teaching in a simulator. The sense of presence, engagement, and ludus of TLE TeachLivE™ are derived from the compelling Mixed Reality that includes components of off-the shelf and emerging technologies. Some of the noted features that have been identified relevant to the ludic nature of TeachLivE include the flow, fidelity, unpredicability, suspension of disbelief, social presence, and gamelike elements. This article explores TLE TeachLivE™ in terms of the ludology, paideic user experience, the source of the ludus, and outcomes of the ludic nature of the experience.
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Exploration Of Tle Teachlive™ And Ludic Learning

Educators, philanthropists, and policymakers have been making pleas for more efficient and effective teacher education and feedback (Buche, Querrec, De Loor, & Chevaillier, 2004; Foundation, 2010; Hawkins & Heflin, 2011). Claims have been made across multiple domains that simulation and virtual environments can enable teachers to practice pedagogy in controlled settings before practicing on children (Loureiro & Bettencourt, 2011; Merchant, 2010; Stanford, 2011). The ludic nature of avatar-based simulation invites analysis of how ludic learning works and the outcomes of using avatars to prepare for actual human interaction. Ongoing research in the use of a classroom simulator includes the constructs of immersion, presence, suspension of disbelief, and engagement (Dieker, Hynes, Hughes, & Smith, 2008). The TLE TeachLivE™ technology allows the virtual classroom to be populated with students who represent a range of ages, cultures, backgrounds, abilities and behaviors, enabling teachers to practice with students that reflect their target population. The position of this paper is that the synergy of immersion, presence, suspension of disbelief, and engagement culminate to generate a ludic experience in the Mixed Reality classroom simulator, TLE TeachLivE™.

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