Securing Remote Obstetrics Monitoring Systems

Securing Remote Obstetrics Monitoring Systems

Chiu C. Tan (Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Michael Korostelev (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Li Bai (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Dimitrios S. Mastrogiannis (Department of Obstetrics, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA) and Jie Wu (Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
Copyright: © 2013 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/ijehmc.2013100103
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Abstract

Reports from many countries describe remote obstetrics monitoring systems as a means of improving the quality of prenatal care. The next generation of remote obstetrics monitoring systems incorporate off-the-shelf equipment like commercial smartphones into their design, to not only reduce the cost of the monitoring equipment, but also to allow for greater flexibility by letting the patient perform monitoring herself, in the comfort of her own home. In this paper, the authors analyzed the security protections of recently proposed monitoring systems and proposed recommendations to improve the security of these systems.
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Remote obstetrics systems have been in operation for a number of years, and their medical and cost effectiveness are well studied (Kerner, Yogev, Belkin, Ben-Haroush, Zeevi, & Hod, 2004). A recent survey paper by Magann et al. provides a good overview of this area (Magann, McKelvey, Hitt, Smith, Azam, & Lowery, 2001). However, there has been relatively little research done on the security of such systems.

There has been work done on the security of related systems. Body sensor networks (BSN) (Chen, Gonzalez, Vasilakos, Cao, & Leung, 2011) and mobile health (mHealth) (Avancha, Baxi, & Kotz, 2011) systems are a growing trend of healthcare monitoring research that is characterized by the use of inexpensive off-the-shelf components, like smartphones, to build health monitoring systems. Given the importance of security, there has been extensive research on BSN (Ng, Sim, & Tan, 2006) and mHealth security (Kotz, 2011). Unlike our work, most security research in this area addresses more general security threats, and do not focus on specific HIPAA requirements.

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