Smartphone Dependence of University Students and Parental Rearing Attitudes

Smartphone Dependence of University Students and Parental Rearing Attitudes

Masahiro Toda (Graduate School of Human Life Sciences, Notre Dame Seishin University, Okayama, Japan & Department of Public Health, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan), Satoko Ezoe (Shimane University Health Service Center Izumo, Shimane, Japan), Kanae Mure (Department of Public Health, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan) and Tatsuya Takeshita (Department of Public Health, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan)
DOI: 10.4018/IJCBPL.2018010102

Abstract

We investigated associations between smartphone dependence and perceived parental rearing attitudes. We administered a set of self-reporting questionnaires to 195 medical-university students designed to evaluate these factors. For females, the maternal high care/high protection group had statistically significantly higher scores for smartphone dependence than the low care/low protection group. No such relationship was apparent for male respondents. These findings suggest, at least for females, that smartphone dependence may be associated with perceived rearing attitudes.
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Materials And Methods

For the study, approved by the Ethics Committee of the Wakayama Medical University, we recruited 195 medical-university students. After informed consent was obtained, the students filled out a set of self-rating questionnaires designed to evaluate smartphone dependence and perceived parenting. Of 177 respondents who both possessed smartphones and had properly completed all the questionnaire items, statistical analysis was performed for 150 respondents (96 males, 54 females) who reported using smartphones mainly to access the Internet. In a previous study, we found that respondents using smartphones mainly to access the Internet had statistically significantly higher scores, both in total and for each WSDS subscale, than respondents who mainly used other devices to access the Internet (Toda, Nishio, & Takeshita, 2015a). Mean (±SD) age for males was 20.5±2.2 years and for females 19.5±1.0 years.

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