Testing a Commercial BCI Device for In-Vehicle Interfaces Evaluation: A Simulator and Real-World Driving Study

Testing a Commercial BCI Device for In-Vehicle Interfaces Evaluation: A Simulator and Real-World Driving Study

Nicolas Louveton (University of Luxembourg, Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg), Korok Sengupta (University of Koblenz, Koblenz, Germany), Rod McCall (Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg), Raphael Frank (University of Luxembourg, Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg) and Thomas Engel (University of Luxembourg, Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg)
DOI: 10.4018/IJMCMC.2017040101

Abstract

This study is assessing the sensitivity of an affordable BCI device in the context of driver distraction in both low-fidelity simulator and real-world driving environments. Twenty-three participants performed a car following task while using a smartphone application involving a range of generic smartphone widgets. On the first hand, the results demonstrated that secondary task completion time is a fairly robust metric as it is sensitive to user-interfaces style while being consistent between the two driving environments. On the second hand, while the BCI attention level metric was not sensitive to the different user-interfaces, we found it to be significantly higher in the real-driving environment than in the simulated one, which reproduces findings obtained with medical-grade sensors.
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Comparison of Simulated and Real Driving

The usage of driving simulators raises the question of transferring the results from simulated (whether of a low or a high quality) to real environments. Several studies found differences between those conditions: Indeed, Reymond et al. (2001) found that in driving simulator experiments curvilinear speed was underestimated when taking a curve. It has also been demonstrated (Boer et al., 2000) that participants braked later and stronger in driving simulator than in a real-driving environment. However, Panerai et al. (2001) showed that speed control did not vary significantly between the two types of environments. Finally, Engström, Johansson and Östlund (2005) found the estimated workload higher in real-driving condition than in simulated one.

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