The Evaluation and Optimization to the Higher Educational Resource Allocation

The Evaluation and Optimization to the Higher Educational Resource Allocation

Shaohua Cheng (Department of Mathematics and Physics, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, Henan, China & Coordinative Innovation Center for Aviation Economic Development, Henan Aviation Economy Research Center, Henan, China) and Yongwei Zhou (Department of Mathematics and Physics, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, Henan, China & Coordinative Innovation Center for Aviation Economic Development, Henan Aviation Economy Research Center, Henan, China)
DOI: 10.4018/IJCINI.2015010105
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Abstract

The paper regards the 42 undergraduate colleges (the independent colleges are not included) of Henan province by the end of 2013 as the object of research, builds the composite indicator rank model of undergraduate colleges' educational resource allocation. On this basis, the authors use the score of integrated factor as the rank of composite indicator. In addition, they cluster to the educational resource allocation of 42 undergraduate colleges by use of cluster analysis under the new factors, and the 42 undergraduate colleges are divided into 4 classes. Finally, according to result of cluster analysis and factor scores, the authors put forward the related suggestion of optimizing educational resource allocation for each cluster colleges.
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1. Introduction

Higher education is the professional education after one finished secondary education; it is the social activity of training advanced professional personnel. While undergraduate education is the cornerstone of the whole higher education, the education resource of undergraduate colleges are the material basis of keeping the undergraduate education’s survival and development [Yan, 2012], their allocation and utilization level has the significant influence on the quality of undergraduate education, so it is of great importance in evaluating the higher education’s allocation situation.

Nowadays, the computer is a significant part of the learner’s daily life. It is, by now, inevitable that methods of teaching and learning should include E- learning components that are based on the computer environment. This new pedagogy, in the case of science teaching and learning, employs: High-order thinking and learning skills, a constructivist approach to science teaching and learning, and information, communication, and scientific literacy skills using digital means and advanced technologies. Teaching in an E-learning environment can contribute to the ability to teach, the ability to learn and most important to bridge between two main components in the classroom, the teacher and the learner. E-learning provides different environments for learners with dynamic, interactive, nonlinear access to a wide range of information (text, graphics, and animation) as well as to self-directed learning in online communication e-mail and forums.

With the help of cloud computing [Xu, 2015(a); Luo, 2011; Hu, 2014], internet of things [Wei, 2015; Xu, 2015(b)], and big data [Xu, 2014; L. Wang, 2013], Informal learning is a longstanding mode of developing personal efficacy, because individuals – as social animals – learn in different contexts, including their interactions with other people, their experiences, and so forth. Informal learning is far from being a new concept. During the first half of the twentieth century, several definitions emerge, with yet more appearing at the turn of the century. Today, informal learning is again becoming the center of discussion for several reasons. First, the Bologna process recognizes informal learning as a basic element in lifelong learning. Second, a necessity to apply learning from observation and experience exists. Third, the emergence of the Internet, mobile devices, and Web 2.0 tools facilitates informal learning. The recognition of in formal learning in the workplace is especially relevant, on account of a number of factors. For example, informal learning enhances employability and produces positive benefits for managers and companies. Furthermore, informal learning may help to develop task-oriented skills and knowledge, and to communicate social norms and favorable patterns of behavior. Informal learning also gives employees the opportunity to learn and keep their skills up to date as part of the overall workplace culture rather than just a training regime. These issues lead to an interest in informal learning in the corporate world, emanating from the desire to capitalize on the intellectual assets of the workforce, to manage organizational knowledge, and to recognize that informal learning may prove to be a cost-effective way to develop competencies.

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