The Role of Smart Technologies to Support Citizen Engagement and Decision Making: The SmartGov Case

The Role of Smart Technologies to Support Citizen Engagement and Decision Making: The SmartGov Case

Gabriela Viale Pereira (Danube University Krems, Krems, Austria), Gregor Eibl (Danube University Krems, Krems, Austria), Constantinos Stylianou (Interfusion Services, Limassol, Cyprus), Gilberto Martínez (Kenus Informática, Paterna, Spain), Haris Neophytou (Interfusion Services, Limassol, Cyprus) and Peter Parycek (Danube University Krems, Krems, Austria)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/IJEGR.2018100101

Abstract

Smart government relies both on the application of digital technologies to enable citizen's participation in order to achieve a high level of citizen centricity and on data-driven decision making in order to improve the quality of life of citizens. Data-driven decisions in turn depend on accessible and reliable datasets, which open government and social media data are likely to promise. The SmartGov project uses digital technologies by integrating open and social media data in Fuzzy Cognitive Maps to model real life problems and simulate different scenarios leading to better decision making. This research performed a multiple-case analysis in two pilot cities. Both municipalities use the technologies to find the best routes: Limassol to improve the garbage collection and Quart de Poblet to improve the walking routes of chaperones guiding children to school. The article proposes a generic framework for Smart City Governance focusing on the inputs and outcomes of this process in the use of technologies for policy making built based on the analysis of the SmartGov.
Article Preview
Top

2. Background

Although smart cities have been studied for 20 years, a sound and comprehensive definition is still lacking, as well as a framework that encompasses all individual initiatives and actions that would allow for important synergies and a clear contribution (Dameri, 2017). Considering the evolutionary journey from “Digital Cities” to “Smart Cities” there was a shift from a more technological perspective with focus on communication networks, sensors and intelligent agents to the human and institutional dimensions of the city (Charalabidis and Theocharopoulou, 2019).

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles
Volume 17: 4 Issues (2021): Forthcoming, Available for Pre-Order
Volume 16: 4 Issues (2020): Forthcoming, Available for Pre-Order
Volume 15: 4 Issues (2019): 3 Released, 1 Forthcoming
Volume 14: 4 Issues (2018)
Volume 13: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 12: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 11: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 10: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 9: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2011)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2010)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2009)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2008)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2007)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2006)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2005)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing