Understanding the Effect of Digital Literacy on Employees' Digital Workplace Continuance Intentions and Individual Performance

Understanding the Effect of Digital Literacy on Employees' Digital Workplace Continuance Intentions and Individual Performance

Elizabeth Marsh (Coventry University, Warwickshire, UK)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 19
DOI: 10.4018/IJDLDC.2018040102

Abstract

While a growing body of literature suggests that employees' digital skills are important to enable both individuals and organisations to make the most of the digital workplace, empirical understanding of their effect on technology adoption and performance is currently limited. Drawing on prior models of technology acceptance and continuance, the present study investigated the effect of digital literacy on behavioural intention to continue using the digital workplace and, ultimately, on individual performance. Linear regression was used to analyse the conceptual model using survey data from 142 employees of a major UK charitable organisation. Results partially supported the model, demonstrating that employees' digital skills effect continuance intentions and individual performance via their perceptions of ease of use. The findings suggest an important role for digital literacy, both as an antecedent to the more general determinants of technology adoption, and in organisational interventions designed to encourage digital workplace adoption.
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Introduction

Digital technologies (such as productivity suites, mobile devices, and collaboration platforms) are now an integral part of most workplaces (Cascio & Montealegre, 2016). Implementing such technologies, however, does not guarantee their success (Schallenmueller, 2016), it is essential that individuals adopt and use them as intended for benefits to be realised (Venkatesh et al., 2003). The digital literacy of the workforce can contribute to this outcome (Mohammadyari and Singh, 2015). While a growing body of literature suggests that employees’ digital skills are important to enable both individuals and organisations to make the most of the digital workplace, empirical understanding of their effect on technology adoption and performance is currently limited.

The present study investigates the effect of digital literacy on behavioural intention to continue using the digital workplace and, ultimately, on individual performance. Data was gathered from the workforce of a major UK charitable organisation. A new conceptual model was developed (see Figure 1) and the pathways within it assessed. It takes as its base model the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh et al., 2003), adapting it using measures of information systems (IS) continuance intention and individual performance (Bhattacherjee, 2001), as well as including digital literacy (Van Deursen, Helsper and Eynon, 2016) as a new antecedent.

Figure 1.

Conceptual Model

IJDLDC.2018040102.f01

Findings have the potential to advance current understanding of technology acceptance in the workplace. Greater understanding of the relationship between digital literacy and digital workplace acceptance may also have important implications for organisations and the design of interventions to help employees make optimal use of digital tools at work.

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