Using the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior (DTPB) to Explain the Intention to Book Tourism Products Online

Using the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior (DTPB) to Explain the Intention to Book Tourism Products Online

Alia Besbes Sahli (Economics and Management, University of Angers, Angers, France) and Patrick Legohérel (Economics and Management, University of Angers, Angers, France)
Copyright: © 2014 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/ijom.2014010101

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to investigate the factors influencing the intention to use the Internet to book tourism products online in Tunisian context. To this end, the authors selected the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior (DTPB) to help account for the intention to book online. The authors conduct an online survey. Data was obtained from 158 questionnaires and analyzed through regression. The study demonstrated the importance of causal relationships between predictor variables and the dependent variable, namely the intention to book online. A novel result, perceived usefulness does not admit a positive impact on the attitude towards online booking. Thus, the study has confirmed the explanatory power of the DTPB model in accounting for consumers' behavioral intention in the context of e-tourism.
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Literature Review

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) is an extension of the theory of reasoned action (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) that predicts behavior over which people do not have complete volitional control. TPB achieves this by “including a predictor of behavioral intention and behavior called perceived behavioral control” (Notani, 1998, p. 248). From the TPB, Taylor and Todd (1995) develop the decomposed TPB (DTPB). This model aims to explain the behavior of users based on the relationship between beliefs, attitudes, intention, and behavior. According to this model, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control are the elements that help to understand the reasons or factors explaining individual actions, even if the intention is considered as the best indicator of behavior (Herrero Crespo & Rodríguez del Bosque, 2008). DTPB focuses on the identification of beliefs and factors those influence the three determinants of behavior, namely attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. This model decomposes attitude into three variables, namely perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and compatibility, a variable arising out of Rogers’s diffusion of innovation theory (Rogers, 1995). Compatibility is “the extent to which [an] innovation is perceived as consistent with existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential users” (Rogers, 1995, p 224; In Eastin, 2002, p. 253).

Compatibility is largely used as an antecedent of attitude. Chen, Gillenson and Sherrell (2002) propose a model integrating Theory of diffusion of innovation- TDI- and TAM and conclude that compatibility influences attitude toward online purchasing and that it is an antecedent of perceived usefulness. Chen and Tan (2004), in a study designed to determine the key success factors for the acceptance of online stores, find that the compatibility variable is an antecedent of attitude among perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, trust, and perceived service quality. The greater compatibility is, the higher the likelihood of the adoption of online stores. Vijayasarathy (2004) and Lin (2007) also show that compatibility has an impact on attitude toward the acceptance of the Internet as tool.

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