Information Technology and Computer Applications in Public Administration: Issues and Trends

Information Technology and Computer Applications in Public Administration: Issues and Trends

G. David Garson (North Carolina State University, USA)
Release Date: January, 1999|Copyright: © 1999 |Pages: 312|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-87828-952-0
ISBN13: 9781878289520|ISBN10: 1878289527|EISBN13: 9781930708587

Description

Written by noted academics and public administration practitioners, this anthology covers the management of public information technology, focusing on its politics, organizational change, policy evolution, investment management, access, privacy and other administrative issues. Additional topics include technology diffusion, control systems, data analysis, geographic information systems, agency websites, online research and more.

Information Technology and Computer Applications in Public Administration: Issues and Trends constitutes a survey of many of the most important dimensions of managing information technology in the public sector. In Part I, chapters address general policy and administrative issues. The chapters of Part II represent applied information technology skills needed by public managers. Together, the chapters of this book make a contribution toward the knowledge and competencies needed by researchers and practitioners in this field.

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

G. David Garson is a full professor of public administration at North Carolina State University, where he teaches courses on American government, research methodology, computer applications, and geographic information systems. He was the recipient of the Donald Campbell Award (1995) from the policy studies organization, American Political Science Association, for outstanding contributions to policy research methodology and of the Aaron Wildavsky Book Award (1997) from the same organization. He is the author of Guide to Writing Quantitative Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (Dekker, 2001), Neural Network Analysis for Social Scientists (1998), and Computer Technology and Social Issues (1995). In addition he is editor of Social Dimensions of Information Technology (2000), Information Technology and Computer Applications in Public Administration: Issues and Trends (1999), and the Handbook of Public Information Systems (1999). He has also authored or edited 17 other books and authored more than 50 articles. For the last 20 years he has served as editor of the Social Science Computer Review and is on the editorial board of four additional journals.