A British and Dutch Caribbean Overseas Territories Training Evaluation Case Study: An HIV/AIDS Workforce Training Perspective

A British and Dutch Caribbean Overseas Territories Training Evaluation Case Study: An HIV/AIDS Workforce Training Perspective

Lennise Baptiste (Independent Researcher, Trinidad and Tobago) and Tamarah Moss (Howard University School of Social Work, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 22
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1808-2.ch002
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Abstract

This chapter will focus on the transfer of learning, the third level of the five levels Phillip (1997) model for the evaluation for training. From this impact evaluation, the authors will share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the training component of the multi-site project implemented to strengthen the response of British and Dutch Caribbean overseas territories (OCTs) to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. With a focus on the transfer of learning, this case study brings theory into a real-life application using the Theory of Change evaluation approach and Appreciative Inquiry to examine the impact of the workforce training activities, which were implemented to enhance the prevention efforts to reduce the spread of HIV. Lessons for current and future evaluators are also highlighted.
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Introduction

Through a case study approach, this chapter focuses on an evaluation of training through the transfer of learning, the third level of the Phillip (1997) five-level model for the evaluation of training. From the perspectives of stakeholders, the authors propose to share the lessons learned from the impact evaluation of the training component, of a six-year multi-site project implemented to strengthen the response of British and Dutch Caribbean overseas territories to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. This case study brings theory into a real-life application, using the theory of change evaluation approach and appreciative inquiry to examine the impact of the workforce training activities which were implemented to enhance the prevention efforts to reduce the spread of HIV. Lessons for current and future evaluators are also highlighted.

Context

This chapter will focus on the transfer of learning, the third level of the five-level Phillip (1997) model for the evaluation for training. From this impact evaluation, the authors will share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the training component, of a multi-site project implemented to strengthen the response of British and Dutch Caribbean overseas territories (OCTs) to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. The Caribbean region has an estimated 230,000 people living with HIV in 2011. There has been a decline in new infections from 22,000 to 13,000 and 50% reduction in AIDS-related death, for the time period of 2001 to 2011. Key populations are communities of people within the general population who continue to be disproportionately impacted by HIV. These vulnerable communities include men who have sex with men (MSM), heterosexuals at high risk, sex workers and their clients, adolescents and youth, persons using drugs, and persons living with HIV. Stigma and discrimination is pervasive and enables barriers for those persons directly and indirectly impacted by HIV, including the workforce.

In the last two decades, the Caribbean region has received funding from numerous donor agencies to implement projects aimed at: (a) preventing the spread of HIV and AIDS, (b) expanding access to treatment and care and support of persons living with HIV (PLWA), and (c) improving surveillance capacity. This case study will focus on the 2014 evaluation of workforce training of a project implemented between 2008 and 2014 in the British and Dutch overseas territories (OCTs). The project had five expected results:

  • 1.

    Enhanced prevention efforts to reduce the spread of HIV in the OCTs

  • 2.

    Expanded access to treatment, care and support for people living with HIV in the OCTs

  • 3.

    Strengthened Human Rights of (PLHIVs) through increased OCT capacity to effectively implement interventions for the reduction of stigma and discrimination

  • 4.

    Strengthened territorial capacity for effective management of a comprehensive HIV response in the OCTs

  • 5.

    Strengthened Regional HIV/AIDS Programming Co-ordination within the OCTs, and between the OCTs and PANCAP (Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV/AIDS) and wider Caribbean regional activities and programs.

The implementing agency determined that the needs and gaps existing at that time for the British and Dutch Caribbean OCTs, stemmed from low human resource capacity to undertake responsibilities related to HIV and AIDS-related prevention, treatment, care, and education efforts. The agency also ascertained that the training of health workers and the multi-sectoral workforce, the establishment of standards of treatment and care, promoting and facilitating skills-sharing between territories and OCTs, establishing electronic data systems, recruiting local professionals and providing funding beyond training to include implementation were needed to strengthen the workforce development response to HIV and AIDS. Thus, a multi-faceted training plan was designed to support the achievement of the program’s results and to build the capacity of different categories of service providers. This chapter will focus on the evaluation of the training activities which were implemented to support the achievement of the outcome enhanced prevention efforts to reduce the spread of HIV in the OCTs.

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