Advancing Active Learning with Adult Learners

Advancing Active Learning with Adult Learners

Cheryl McFadden (East Carolina University, USA)
Copyright: © 2013 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-4249-2.ch045
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

A yearlong journey resulted in a professor developing and implementing a course using a new emergent theory of adult learning that builds upon the concept of andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn. This model is referred to as ACES: Accessing student content knowledge, Creating student-centered goals, Engaging students in real-life learning experiences, and Soliciting feedback using non-traditional methods. This case study is about the development and implementation of this process and its success. The study demonstrates how adult learners prefer to be active participants in the learning process.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

When considering adult learners, one must first understand the concepts of andragogy and pedagogy as they provide a context through which adult learning is explained. Andragogy is defined as the “art and science of helping adults learn, while pedagogy is the art and science of teaching or instruction” (Knowles, 1980, p. 43). Popularized by Malcolm Knowles, andragogy is generally considered the most well-known model utilized to describe adult learning (Merriam, Caffarella, & Baumgartner, 2007). Knowles established four assumptions (a fifth was later added) which ultimately led to the development of customized learning programs for adults. His assumptions were that:

Key Terms in this Chapter

Pedagogy: The “… art and science of teaching or instruction” ( Knowles, 1980 , p. 43).

Adult Learners: “Any student, regardless of age, who has adult responsibilities beyond college classes, and for whom those adult responsibilities takes priorities in times of crisis” (National Academic Advising Association, n.d. AU15: The in-text citation "National Academic Advising Association, n.d." is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

McClusky’s Theory of Power-Load-Margin: Identifies two the key factors in every adult’s life: the load he or she carries and the power available to support carrying this load. He defines load as “the self and social demands required to maintain a minimal level of autonomy” and power as the infrastructure which supports the load such as family, friends, social and economic abilities ( McClusky, 1970 , p. 27). This theory is denoted in the formula M=L/P where M=Margin, L=Load, and P=Power.

McClusky’s Theory of Margin: “A function of the relationship of load to power. Load is defined as the self and the social demands required by a person to maintain a minimal level of autonomy and power is defined as the resources such as possessions, position, allies, etc., which a person can command in coping with load” ( McClusky, 1970 ).

Andragogy: The “art and science of helping adults learn” ( Knowles, 1980 , p. 43).

Experiential Learning Theory: Experiential learning theory defines learning as “the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience. Knowledge results from the combination of grasping and transforming experience” ( Kolb, 1984 , p. 41).

Constructivism: The learning process which allows a student to experience an environment first-hand, thereby, giving the student reliable, trust-worthy knowledge. The student is required to act upon the environment to both acquire and test new knowledge (Glaserfeld, 1989 AU16: The in-text citation "Glaserfeld, 1989" is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset